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Bone Status in Professional Cyclists

Campion, F.; Nevill, A. M.; Karlsson, Magnus LU ; Lounana, J.; Shabani, M.; Fardellone, P. and Medelli, J. (2010) In International Journal of Sports Medicine 31(7). p.511-515
Abstract
Professional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; (V) over dotO(2) max: 70.5 (5.5) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1)) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p = 0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g . cm(-2);... (More)
Professional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; (V) over dotO(2) max: 70.5 (5.5) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1)) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p = 0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g . cm(-2); p < 0.001), arms (0.903 (0.075) vs. 0.950 (0.085), p = 0.028), legs (1.290 (0.112) vs. 1.479 (0.138); p < 0.001), spine (0.948 (0.100) vs. 1.117 (0.147) g . cm(-2); p < 0.001), pelvis (1.054 (0.084) vs. 1.244 (0.142), p < 0.001), lumbar spine (1.046 (0.103) vs. 1.244 (0.167), P < 0.001), and femoral neck BMD (0.900 (0.115) vs. 1.093 (0.137), p < 0.001) compared to reference subjects. Professional cycling appears to negatively affect BMD in young healthy and highly active males, the femoral neck being the most affected site (-18%) in spite of the elevated muscle contractions inherent to the activity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
professional cycling, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, bone density, dietary calcium, endurance training
in
International Journal of Sports Medicine
volume
31
issue
7
pages
511 - 515
publisher
Georg Thieme Verlag
external identifiers
  • wos:000280189200012
  • scopus:77954133227
ISSN
0172-4622
DOI
10.1055/s-0029-1243616
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f60abb3-0c39-467a-82bc-c4ce78e33643 (old id 1654403)
date added to LUP
2010-09-01 09:07:25
date last changed
2018-06-10 04:15:55
@article{2f60abb3-0c39-467a-82bc-c4ce78e33643,
  abstract     = {Professional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; (V) over dotO(2) max: 70.5 (5.5) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1)) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p = 0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g . cm(-2); p &lt; 0.001), arms (0.903 (0.075) vs. 0.950 (0.085), p = 0.028), legs (1.290 (0.112) vs. 1.479 (0.138); p &lt; 0.001), spine (0.948 (0.100) vs. 1.117 (0.147) g . cm(-2); p &lt; 0.001), pelvis (1.054 (0.084) vs. 1.244 (0.142), p &lt; 0.001), lumbar spine (1.046 (0.103) vs. 1.244 (0.167), P &lt; 0.001), and femoral neck BMD (0.900 (0.115) vs. 1.093 (0.137), p &lt; 0.001) compared to reference subjects. Professional cycling appears to negatively affect BMD in young healthy and highly active males, the femoral neck being the most affected site (-18%) in spite of the elevated muscle contractions inherent to the activity.},
  author       = {Campion, F. and Nevill, A. M. and Karlsson, Magnus and Lounana, J. and Shabani, M. and Fardellone, P. and Medelli, J.},
  issn         = {0172-4622},
  keyword      = {professional cycling,dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry,bone density,dietary calcium,endurance training},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {511--515},
  publisher    = {Georg Thieme Verlag},
  series       = {International Journal of Sports Medicine},
  title        = {Bone Status in Professional Cyclists},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0029-1243616},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}