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Increased prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms associated with impaired quality of life in renal transplant recipients.

Ekberg, Henrik LU ; Kyllonen, Lauri; Madsen, Soren; Grave, Gisle; Solbu, Dag and Holdaas, Hallvard (2007) In Transplantation 83(3). p.282-289
Abstract
Background. Immunosuppressive therapies have been associated with gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, which may impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods. In this survey, 4,232 renal transplant recipients from Denmark, Finland, Nor-way, and Sweden completed the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). SF-36 scores were compared with country norm values. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify immunosuppressants associated with GI symptoms. Results. The prevalence of troublesome GI symptoms (GSRS > 1) was 83% for indigestion, 69% for abdominal pain, 58% for constipation, 53% for diarrhea, 47% for reflux, and 92% for any GI symptom. Compared with the general... (More)
Background. Immunosuppressive therapies have been associated with gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, which may impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods. In this survey, 4,232 renal transplant recipients from Denmark, Finland, Nor-way, and Sweden completed the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). SF-36 scores were compared with country norm values. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify immunosuppressants associated with GI symptoms. Results. The prevalence of troublesome GI symptoms (GSRS > 1) was 83% for indigestion, 69% for abdominal pain, 58% for constipation, 53% for diarrhea, 47% for reflux, and 92% for any GI symptom. Compared with the general population, HRQoL was most commonly meaningfully impaired in the general health dimension (53% of patients). The presence and severity of GI symptoms were associated with worse HRQoL. Tacrolimus showed a significant association with diarrhea (odds ratio [OR]: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-2.0) and constipation (OR: 1.3; 95% Cl: 1.1-1.6), and sirolimus with indigestion (OR: 2.9; 95% Cl: 1.0-8.1) and abdominal pain (OR: 2.2; 95% Cl: 1.1-4.4). Conclusions. GI symptoms are associated with impaired HRQoL in the renal transplant population. Managing GI symptoms by careful choice of immunosuppressants should be a focus for improving HRQoL in renal transplant recipients (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Transplantation
volume
83
issue
3
pages
282 - 289
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000244375900010
  • scopus:33846980744
ISSN
1534-6080
DOI
10.1097/01.tp.0000251923.14697.f5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b40511f5-166a-4108-8474-19b10ff118d0 (old id 165738)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17297402&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 09:49:47
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:54:26
@article{b40511f5-166a-4108-8474-19b10ff118d0,
  abstract     = {Background. Immunosuppressive therapies have been associated with gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, which may impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods. In this survey, 4,232 renal transplant recipients from Denmark, Finland, Nor-way, and Sweden completed the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). SF-36 scores were compared with country norm values. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify immunosuppressants associated with GI symptoms. Results. The prevalence of troublesome GI symptoms (GSRS > 1) was 83% for indigestion, 69% for abdominal pain, 58% for constipation, 53% for diarrhea, 47% for reflux, and 92% for any GI symptom. Compared with the general population, HRQoL was most commonly meaningfully impaired in the general health dimension (53% of patients). The presence and severity of GI symptoms were associated with worse HRQoL. Tacrolimus showed a significant association with diarrhea (odds ratio [OR]: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-2.0) and constipation (OR: 1.3; 95% Cl: 1.1-1.6), and sirolimus with indigestion (OR: 2.9; 95% Cl: 1.0-8.1) and abdominal pain (OR: 2.2; 95% Cl: 1.1-4.4). Conclusions. GI symptoms are associated with impaired HRQoL in the renal transplant population. Managing GI symptoms by careful choice of immunosuppressants should be a focus for improving HRQoL in renal transplant recipients},
  author       = {Ekberg, Henrik and Kyllonen, Lauri and Madsen, Soren and Grave, Gisle and Solbu, Dag and Holdaas, Hallvard},
  issn         = {1534-6080},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {282--289},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Transplantation},
  title        = {Increased prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms associated with impaired quality of life in renal transplant recipients.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.tp.0000251923.14697.f5},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2007},
}