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No Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Gait Performance in Persons With Late Effects of Polio: A Pilot Study.

Brogårdh, Christina LU ; Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU and Lexell, Jan LU (2010) In Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 91(9). p.1474-1477
Abstract
Brogårdh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J. No effects of whole-body vibration training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio: a pilot study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio. DESIGN: A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training. SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64+/-6.7y; range, 55-71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. INTERVENTIONS: All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees... (More)
Brogårdh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J. No effects of whole-body vibration training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio: a pilot study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio. DESIGN: A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training. SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64+/-6.7y; range, 55-71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. INTERVENTIONS: All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40 degrees -55 degrees up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests). RESULTS: All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
volume
91
issue
9
pages
1474 - 1477
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000281921400026
  • pmid:20801271
  • scopus:77956258136
ISSN
0003-9993
DOI
10.1016/j.apmr.2010.06.024
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d17c13d7-0a34-4918-bb38-c2673c34562f (old id 1664932)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20801271?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-09-03 09:31:25
date last changed
2018-11-21 20:48:54
@article{d17c13d7-0a34-4918-bb38-c2673c34562f,
  abstract     = {Brogårdh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J. No effects of whole-body vibration training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio: a pilot study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio. DESIGN: A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training. SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64+/-6.7y; range, 55-71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. INTERVENTIONS: All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40 degrees -55 degrees up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests). RESULTS: All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio.},
  author       = {Brogårdh, Christina and Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {0003-9993},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1474--1477},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {No Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Gait Performance in Persons With Late Effects of Polio: A Pilot Study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2010.06.024},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2010},
}