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Current trends in stroke rehabilitation. A review with focus on brain plasticity.

Johansson, Barbro LU (2011) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 123. p.147-159
Abstract
Johansson BB. Current trends in stroke rehabilitation. A review with focus on brain plasticity. Acta Neurol Scand: DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01417.x. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Current understanding of brain plasticity has lead to new approaches in ischemic stroke rehabilitation. Stroke units that combine good medical and nursing care with task-oriented intense training in an environment that provides confidence, stimulation and motivation significantly improve outcome. Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are applied in rehabilitation of motor function. The long-term effect, optimal way of stimulation and possibly efficacy in cognitive rehabilitation need... (More)
Johansson BB. Current trends in stroke rehabilitation. A review with focus on brain plasticity. Acta Neurol Scand: DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01417.x. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Current understanding of brain plasticity has lead to new approaches in ischemic stroke rehabilitation. Stroke units that combine good medical and nursing care with task-oriented intense training in an environment that provides confidence, stimulation and motivation significantly improve outcome. Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are applied in rehabilitation of motor function. The long-term effect, optimal way of stimulation and possibly efficacy in cognitive rehabilitation need evaluation. Methods based on multisensory integration of motor, cognitive, and perceptual processes including action observation, mental training, and virtual reality are being tested. Different approaches of intensive aphasia training are described. Recent data on intensive melodic intonation therapy indicate that even patients with very severe non-fluent aphasia can regain speech through homotopic white matter tract plasticity. Music therapy is applied in motor and cognitive rehabilitation. To avoid the confounding effect of spontaneous improvement, most trials are preformed >/=3 months post stroke. Randomized controlled trials starting earlier after strokes are needed. More attention should be given to stroke heterogeneity, cognitive rehabilitation, and social adjustment and to genetic differences, including the role of BDNF polymorphism in brain plasticity. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
volume
123
pages
147 - 159
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000286667900001
  • pmid:20726844
  • scopus:79251509921
ISSN
1600-0404
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01417.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
53b99ded-7161-4d31-b864-4f810a577137 (old id 1665156)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20726844?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-09-14 09:52:52
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:12:33
@article{53b99ded-7161-4d31-b864-4f810a577137,
  abstract     = {Johansson BB. Current trends in stroke rehabilitation. A review with focus on brain plasticity. Acta Neurol Scand: DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01417.x. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Current understanding of brain plasticity has lead to new approaches in ischemic stroke rehabilitation. Stroke units that combine good medical and nursing care with task-oriented intense training in an environment that provides confidence, stimulation and motivation significantly improve outcome. Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are applied in rehabilitation of motor function. The long-term effect, optimal way of stimulation and possibly efficacy in cognitive rehabilitation need evaluation. Methods based on multisensory integration of motor, cognitive, and perceptual processes including action observation, mental training, and virtual reality are being tested. Different approaches of intensive aphasia training are described. Recent data on intensive melodic intonation therapy indicate that even patients with very severe non-fluent aphasia can regain speech through homotopic white matter tract plasticity. Music therapy is applied in motor and cognitive rehabilitation. To avoid the confounding effect of spontaneous improvement, most trials are preformed >/=3 months post stroke. Randomized controlled trials starting earlier after strokes are needed. More attention should be given to stroke heterogeneity, cognitive rehabilitation, and social adjustment and to genetic differences, including the role of BDNF polymorphism in brain plasticity.},
  author       = {Johansson, Barbro},
  issn         = {1600-0404},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {147--159},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Current trends in stroke rehabilitation. A review with focus on brain plasticity.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01417.x},
  volume       = {123},
  year         = {2011},
}