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Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in relation to fasting glucose in healthy subjects.

Ahrén, Bo LU (2007) In Diabetes Care 30(3). p.644-648
Abstract
OBJECTIVE - This study evaluated insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects with normal fasting glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 148 healthy women (aged 53-70 years) underwent a glucose-dependent arginine stimulation test and a 2-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. In the arginine test, arginine (5 g) was injected intravenously under baseline (fasting) conditions and after raising the glucose levels to 15 and > 28 mmol/l. From this test, the acute insulin response (AIR) to arginine during the three glucose levels (AIR(1), AIR(2), and AIR,) were estimated. The subjects were divided into quartiles of fasting glucose (n = 37 in each group [range < 432; 4.33-4.84; 4.85-5.22; and 5:23-6.1 mmol/l,... (More)
OBJECTIVE - This study evaluated insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects with normal fasting glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 148 healthy women (aged 53-70 years) underwent a glucose-dependent arginine stimulation test and a 2-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. In the arginine test, arginine (5 g) was injected intravenously under baseline (fasting) conditions and after raising the glucose levels to 15 and > 28 mmol/l. From this test, the acute insulin response (AIR) to arginine during the three glucose levels (AIR(1), AIR(2), and AIR,) were estimated. The subjects were divided into quartiles of fasting glucose (n = 37 in each group [range < 432; 4.33-4.84; 4.85-5.22; and 5:23-6.1 mmol/l, respectively). RESULTS - The results show that 1) AIR(1) was higher in subjects in the two highest quartiles (P = 0.004), 2) AIR(3) was higher in the quartile with the highest fasting glucose (P = 0.012), and 3) insulin sensitivity was reduced in subjects in the highest quartile (P = 0.026) compared with the lower quartiles. The results also show, in contrast, that AIR(2) did not show a similar trend to be increased at higher fasting glucose. CONCLUSIONS - it is concluded that 1) raised fasting glucose (albeit still within normal values) augments baseline and maximal arginine-induced insulin secretion in healthy subjects, and 2) this is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity. This suggests that high, but still normal, fasting glucose may contribute to the augmented insulin secretion in subjects with low insulin sensitivity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
30
issue
3
pages
644 - 648
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000244941200030
  • scopus:33847676456
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc06-1759
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8c553ced-a0dd-4fa5-a32c-ebd60f27f1d9 (old id 167005)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17327334&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-06-26 15:56:20
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:37:44
@article{8c553ced-a0dd-4fa5-a32c-ebd60f27f1d9,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE - This study evaluated insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects with normal fasting glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 148 healthy women (aged 53-70 years) underwent a glucose-dependent arginine stimulation test and a 2-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. In the arginine test, arginine (5 g) was injected intravenously under baseline (fasting) conditions and after raising the glucose levels to 15 and &gt; 28 mmol/l. From this test, the acute insulin response (AIR) to arginine during the three glucose levels (AIR(1), AIR(2), and AIR,) were estimated. The subjects were divided into quartiles of fasting glucose (n = 37 in each group [range &lt; 432; 4.33-4.84; 4.85-5.22; and 5:23-6.1 mmol/l, respectively). RESULTS - The results show that 1) AIR(1) was higher in subjects in the two highest quartiles (P = 0.004), 2) AIR(3) was higher in the quartile with the highest fasting glucose (P = 0.012), and 3) insulin sensitivity was reduced in subjects in the highest quartile (P = 0.026) compared with the lower quartiles. The results also show, in contrast, that AIR(2) did not show a similar trend to be increased at higher fasting glucose. CONCLUSIONS - it is concluded that 1) raised fasting glucose (albeit still within normal values) augments baseline and maximal arginine-induced insulin secretion in healthy subjects, and 2) this is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity. This suggests that high, but still normal, fasting glucose may contribute to the augmented insulin secretion in subjects with low insulin sensitivity.},
  author       = {Ahrén, Bo},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {644--648},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in relation to fasting glucose in healthy subjects.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc06-1759},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2007},
}