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Factors influencing subjective quality of life in patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders: A pooled analysis

Priebe, Stefan; Reininghaus, Ulrich; McCabe, Rosemarie; Burns, Tom; Eklund, Mona LU ; Hansson, Lars LU ; Junghan, Ulrich; Kallert, Thomas; van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs and Ruggeri, Mirella, et al. (2010) In Schizophrenia Research 121(1-3). p.251-258
Abstract
Subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an important outcome in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. However, there is only limited evidence on factors influencing SQOL, and little is known about whether the same factors influence SQOL in patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with SQOL and test whether these factors are equally important in schizophrenia and other disorders. For this we used a pooled data set obtained from 16 studies that had used either the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile or the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life for assessing SQ01_ The sample comprised 3936 patients with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and neurotic disorders. After... (More)
Subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an important outcome in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. However, there is only limited evidence on factors influencing SQOL, and little is known about whether the same factors influence SQOL in patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with SQOL and test whether these factors are equally important in schizophrenia and other disorders. For this we used a pooled data set obtained from 16 studies that had used either the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile or the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life for assessing SQ01_ The sample comprised 3936 patients with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and neurotic disorders. After controlling for confounding factors, within-subject clustering, and heterogeneity of findings across studies in linear mixed models, patients with schizophrenia had more favourable SQOL scores than those with mood and neurotic disorders. In all diagnostic groups, older patients, those in employment, and those with lower symptom scores had higher SQOL scores. Whilst the strength of the association between age and SQOL did not differ across diagnostic groups, symptom levels were more strongly associated with SQOL in neurotic than in mood disorders and schizophrenia. The association of employment and SQOL was stronger in mood and neurotic disorders than in schizophrenia. The findings may inform the use and interpretation of SQOL data for patients with schizophrenia. C 2009 Elsevier BA/. All rights reserved. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Schizophrenia, Quality of life, Outcomes, Psychopathology
in
Schizophrenia Research
volume
121
issue
1-3
pages
251 - 258
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000281073700032
  • scopus:77955057108
ISSN
0920-9964
DOI
10.1016/j.schres.2009.12.020
language
English
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yes
id
dfe04f5d-c2fc-4ebf-a0c4-1cd3269dbd36 (old id 1673565)
date added to LUP
2010-09-23 09:44:35
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2018-06-24 03:21:42
@article{dfe04f5d-c2fc-4ebf-a0c4-1cd3269dbd36,
  abstract     = {Subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an important outcome in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. However, there is only limited evidence on factors influencing SQOL, and little is known about whether the same factors influence SQOL in patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with SQOL and test whether these factors are equally important in schizophrenia and other disorders. For this we used a pooled data set obtained from 16 studies that had used either the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile or the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life for assessing SQ01_ The sample comprised 3936 patients with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and neurotic disorders. After controlling for confounding factors, within-subject clustering, and heterogeneity of findings across studies in linear mixed models, patients with schizophrenia had more favourable SQOL scores than those with mood and neurotic disorders. In all diagnostic groups, older patients, those in employment, and those with lower symptom scores had higher SQOL scores. Whilst the strength of the association between age and SQOL did not differ across diagnostic groups, symptom levels were more strongly associated with SQOL in neurotic than in mood disorders and schizophrenia. The association of employment and SQOL was stronger in mood and neurotic disorders than in schizophrenia. The findings may inform the use and interpretation of SQOL data for patients with schizophrenia. C 2009 Elsevier BA/. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Priebe, Stefan and Reininghaus, Ulrich and McCabe, Rosemarie and Burns, Tom and Eklund, Mona and Hansson, Lars and Junghan, Ulrich and Kallert, Thomas and van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs and Ruggeri, Mirella and Slade, Mike and Wang, Duolao},
  issn         = {0920-9964},
  keyword      = {Schizophrenia,Quality of life,Outcomes,Psychopathology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {251--258},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Schizophrenia Research},
  title        = {Factors influencing subjective quality of life in patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders: A pooled analysis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2009.12.020},
  volume       = {121},
  year         = {2010},
}