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Effects of l-arginine on cerebral blood flow, microvascular permeability, number of perfused capillaries, and brain water content in the traumatized mouse brain.

Lundblad, Cornelia LU and Bentzer, Peter LU (2007) In Microvascular Research 74. p.1-8
Abstract
It is has been suggested that decreased production of the vasodilatory and anti-aggregative substance NO (nitric oxide) may result in lower cerebral blood flow (CBF) in injured areas of the traumatized brain. The NO-precursor L-arginine has been shown to counteract CBF decreases early after trauma, but microcirculatory and more long-term effects on CBF of L-arginine have not been investigated. In an attempt to analyze effects Of L-arginine on the microcirculation in the traumatized brain, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects Of L-arginine compared to vehicle (0.9% saline) following a standardized controlled cortical-impact brain trauma in mice. Cerebral blood flow (autoradiography [C-14]-iodoantipyrine), number of... (More)
It is has been suggested that decreased production of the vasodilatory and anti-aggregative substance NO (nitric oxide) may result in lower cerebral blood flow (CBF) in injured areas of the traumatized brain. The NO-precursor L-arginine has been shown to counteract CBF decreases early after trauma, but microcirculatory and more long-term effects on CBF of L-arginine have not been investigated. In an attempt to analyze effects Of L-arginine on the microcirculation in the traumatized brain, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects Of L-arginine compared to vehicle (0.9% saline) following a standardized controlled cortical-impact brain trauma in mice. Cerebral blood flow (autoradiography [C-14]-iodoantipyrine), number of perfused capillaries (FITC-dextran fluorescence technique), brain water content (wet vs. dry weight) and the blood to brain transfer constant K-i for [Cr-51]-EDTA were analyzed in the injured and the contralateral cortex. Cortical blood flow in the injured cortex was 0.43 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min and 0.8 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min 3 h after trauma in the vehicle and L-arginine groups, respectively (p < 0.05), and no treatment effect was seen 24 h after trauma. The number of perfused capillaries decreased following trauma and was unaffected by L-arginine. Ki increased following trauma and was unaffected by L-arginine. Brain water content was lower in the L-arginine group than in the vehicle group 3 h after trauma and there was no difference between the groups 24 h after trauma. We conclude that L-arginine reduces brain edema formation and improves cortical blood flow in the early phase after a brain trauma, whereas no circulatory effects can be seen after prolonged treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Microvascular Research
volume
74
pages
1 - 8
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000247715000001
  • scopus:34249813108
ISSN
1095-9319
DOI
10.1016/j.mvr.2007.03.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0c7a68be-d3d8-445e-bd3d-1a04a268dc7a (old id 167365)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17459424&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-10 09:47:38
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:52:53
@article{0c7a68be-d3d8-445e-bd3d-1a04a268dc7a,
  abstract     = {It is has been suggested that decreased production of the vasodilatory and anti-aggregative substance NO (nitric oxide) may result in lower cerebral blood flow (CBF) in injured areas of the traumatized brain. The NO-precursor L-arginine has been shown to counteract CBF decreases early after trauma, but microcirculatory and more long-term effects on CBF of L-arginine have not been investigated. In an attempt to analyze effects Of L-arginine on the microcirculation in the traumatized brain, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects Of L-arginine compared to vehicle (0.9% saline) following a standardized controlled cortical-impact brain trauma in mice. Cerebral blood flow (autoradiography [C-14]-iodoantipyrine), number of perfused capillaries (FITC-dextran fluorescence technique), brain water content (wet vs. dry weight) and the blood to brain transfer constant K-i for [Cr-51]-EDTA were analyzed in the injured and the contralateral cortex. Cortical blood flow in the injured cortex was 0.43 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min and 0.8 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min 3 h after trauma in the vehicle and L-arginine groups, respectively (p &lt; 0.05), and no treatment effect was seen 24 h after trauma. The number of perfused capillaries decreased following trauma and was unaffected by L-arginine. Ki increased following trauma and was unaffected by L-arginine. Brain water content was lower in the L-arginine group than in the vehicle group 3 h after trauma and there was no difference between the groups 24 h after trauma. We conclude that L-arginine reduces brain edema formation and improves cortical blood flow in the early phase after a brain trauma, whereas no circulatory effects can be seen after prolonged treatment.},
  author       = {Lundblad, Cornelia and Bentzer, Peter},
  issn         = {1095-9319},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--8},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Microvascular Research},
  title        = {Effects of l-arginine on cerebral blood flow, microvascular permeability, number of perfused capillaries, and brain water content in the traumatized mouse brain.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mvr.2007.03.001},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {2007},
}