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Quantitative genetics research in Zebra Finches: where we are and where to go

Tschirren, Barbara LU and Postma, Erik (2010) In Emu 110(3). p.268-278
Abstract
The ease with which Zebra Finches can be kept and bred in captivity makes them a suitable model for avian quantitative genetic studies. After a brief introduction to some quantitative genetic concepts, we here provide an up-to-date overview of quantitative genetic studies in Zebra Finches. We discuss what these studies can teach us about the evolutionary and behavioural ecology of Zebra Finches and song birds in general, and make suggestions for future research. Throughout this article we plead for a greater appreciation of the advantages offered by working on captive birds, but also discuss their limitations. Although quantitative genetic analyses in natural populations are becoming increasingly powerful, these studies lack the control... (More)
The ease with which Zebra Finches can be kept and bred in captivity makes them a suitable model for avian quantitative genetic studies. After a brief introduction to some quantitative genetic concepts, we here provide an up-to-date overview of quantitative genetic studies in Zebra Finches. We discuss what these studies can teach us about the evolutionary and behavioural ecology of Zebra Finches and song birds in general, and make suggestions for future research. Throughout this article we plead for a greater appreciation of the advantages offered by working on captive birds, but also discuss their limitations. Although quantitative genetic analyses in natural populations are becoming increasingly powerful, these studies lack the control possible in captivity. However, obtaining meaningful estimates of the type and strength of selection acting on phenotypic variation is more difficult in captivity. Hence, quantitative genetic studies in the wild and captivity each have their strengths and weaknesses and should be considered complementary rather than opposing. However, whereas quantitative genetic studies in the wild have boomed, the unique advantages offered by captive Zebra Finches have remained underexploited. Here we make a first attempt at changing this by highlighting what we believe may be fruitful lines for future research. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Emu
volume
110
issue
3
pages
268 - 278
publisher
CSIRO Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000281029800011
  • scopus:77955915873
ISSN
0158-4197
DOI
10.1071/MU09092
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
46ad8e0f-28e6-480e-9437-959481796570 (old id 1673885)
date added to LUP
2010-09-22 14:53:17
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:25:31
@article{46ad8e0f-28e6-480e-9437-959481796570,
  abstract     = {The ease with which Zebra Finches can be kept and bred in captivity makes them a suitable model for avian quantitative genetic studies. After a brief introduction to some quantitative genetic concepts, we here provide an up-to-date overview of quantitative genetic studies in Zebra Finches. We discuss what these studies can teach us about the evolutionary and behavioural ecology of Zebra Finches and song birds in general, and make suggestions for future research. Throughout this article we plead for a greater appreciation of the advantages offered by working on captive birds, but also discuss their limitations. Although quantitative genetic analyses in natural populations are becoming increasingly powerful, these studies lack the control possible in captivity. However, obtaining meaningful estimates of the type and strength of selection acting on phenotypic variation is more difficult in captivity. Hence, quantitative genetic studies in the wild and captivity each have their strengths and weaknesses and should be considered complementary rather than opposing. However, whereas quantitative genetic studies in the wild have boomed, the unique advantages offered by captive Zebra Finches have remained underexploited. Here we make a first attempt at changing this by highlighting what we believe may be fruitful lines for future research.},
  author       = {Tschirren, Barbara and Postma, Erik},
  issn         = {0158-4197},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {268--278},
  publisher    = {CSIRO Publishing},
  series       = {Emu},
  title        = {Quantitative genetics research in Zebra Finches: where we are and where to go},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MU09092},
  volume       = {110},
  year         = {2010},
}