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Lactobacillus plantarum 299v Enhances the Concentrations of Fecal Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

Wullt, Marlene LU ; Johansson Hagslatt, Marie-Louise; Odenholt, Inga LU and Berggren, Anna (2007) In Digestive Diseases and Sciences 52. p.2082-2086
Abstract
Our objective was to document how intake of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v affects the concentrations of fecal organic acids during and after metronidazole treatment in 19 patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Fecal samples were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. After intake of metronidazole a significant decrease in total short-chain fatty acids was seen in the placebo group (from 77.1 to 45.5 mu mol/g; P=0.028) but not in the Lactobacillus group (79.8-60.4 mu mol/g). In addition, a statistically significant difference between treatment groups was noted for butyrate (5.6-1.2 mu mol/g in the placebo group vs. 7.6-5.6 mu mol/g in the Lactobacillus group; P=0.047). At the end of the study and after cessation... (More)
Our objective was to document how intake of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v affects the concentrations of fecal organic acids during and after metronidazole treatment in 19 patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Fecal samples were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. After intake of metronidazole a significant decrease in total short-chain fatty acids was seen in the placebo group (from 77.1 to 45.5 mu mol/g; P=0.028) but not in the Lactobacillus group (79.8-60.4 mu mol/g). In addition, a statistically significant difference between treatment groups was noted for butyrate (5.6-1.2 mu mol/g in the placebo group vs. 7.6-5.6 mu mol/g in the Lactobacillus group; P=0.047). At the end of the study and after cessation of placebo or Lactobacillus, the total short-chain fatty acids rose to the same levels as before antibiotic treatment in the placebo group. Both treatment groups showed a significant decrease in concentrations of succinate at the end of the study in comparison to the time when metronidazole intake was stopped (6.3-1.5 mu mol/g in the placebo group versus 9.3-0.9 mu mol/g in the Lactobacillus group; P=0.028). The present study of fecal samples from a clinical trial is the first to demonstrate that administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v reduces the negative effects of an antibiotic on colonic fermentation. The intake of this probiotic strain may thereby provide an additional benefit for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
treatment, microflora, colonic, diarrhea, probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, short-chain fatty acids, recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated
in
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
volume
52
pages
2082 - 2086
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000248810300010
  • scopus:34547830316
ISSN
1573-2568
DOI
10.1007/s10620-006-9123-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0e3fe9c9-f7ce-4ca7-948b-289527758392 (old id 167738)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17420953&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-30 11:05:15
date last changed
2017-04-02 03:27:24
@article{0e3fe9c9-f7ce-4ca7-948b-289527758392,
  abstract     = {Our objective was to document how intake of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v affects the concentrations of fecal organic acids during and after metronidazole treatment in 19 patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Fecal samples were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. After intake of metronidazole a significant decrease in total short-chain fatty acids was seen in the placebo group (from 77.1 to 45.5 mu mol/g; P=0.028) but not in the Lactobacillus group (79.8-60.4 mu mol/g). In addition, a statistically significant difference between treatment groups was noted for butyrate (5.6-1.2 mu mol/g in the placebo group vs. 7.6-5.6 mu mol/g in the Lactobacillus group; P=0.047). At the end of the study and after cessation of placebo or Lactobacillus, the total short-chain fatty acids rose to the same levels as before antibiotic treatment in the placebo group. Both treatment groups showed a significant decrease in concentrations of succinate at the end of the study in comparison to the time when metronidazole intake was stopped (6.3-1.5 mu mol/g in the placebo group versus 9.3-0.9 mu mol/g in the Lactobacillus group; P=0.028). The present study of fecal samples from a clinical trial is the first to demonstrate that administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v reduces the negative effects of an antibiotic on colonic fermentation. The intake of this probiotic strain may thereby provide an additional benefit for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.},
  author       = {Wullt, Marlene and Johansson Hagslatt, Marie-Louise and Odenholt, Inga and Berggren, Anna},
  issn         = {1573-2568},
  keyword      = {treatment,microflora,colonic,diarrhea,probiotic bacteria,Lactobacillus plantarum 299v,short-chain fatty acids,recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {2082--2086},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Digestive Diseases and Sciences},
  title        = {Lactobacillus plantarum 299v Enhances the Concentrations of Fecal Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-006-9123-3},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2007},
}