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Instructive cross-talk between neural progenitor cells and gliomas.

Staflin, Karin LU ; Lindvall, Magnus LU ; Zuchner, Thole and Lundberg, Cecilia LU (2007) In Journal of Neuroscience Research 85(10). p.2147-2159
Abstract
Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and offer a poor prognosis in patients because of their infiltrative and treatment-resistant nature. The median survival time after diagnosis is approximately 11-12 months. There is a strong need for novel treatment modalities in targeting gliomas, and recent advances use neural progenitor cells as delivery systems for different therapeutic strategies. In this study, we show that rat embryonic neural progenitor cell (NPC) lines, transplanted at a distant site from a 3-day-preestablished glioma in the striatum, were able to migrate toward and colocalize with tumor isles without general spread into the brain parenchyma. Upon encounter with tumor, neural progenitor cells changed phenotype and... (More)
Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and offer a poor prognosis in patients because of their infiltrative and treatment-resistant nature. The median survival time after diagnosis is approximately 11-12 months. There is a strong need for novel treatment modalities in targeting gliomas, and recent advances use neural progenitor cells as delivery systems for different therapeutic strategies. In this study, we show that rat embryonic neural progenitor cell (NPC) lines, transplanted at a distant site from a 3-day-preestablished glioma in the striatum, were able to migrate toward and colocalize with tumor isles without general spread into the brain parenchyma. Upon encounter with tumor, neural progenitor cells changed phenotype and became vimentin positive. These results demonstrate that transplanted neural progenitor cells respond to queues from a tumor and home to and exert an antitumor effect on the preestablished glioma, significantly decreasing the tumor volume with approximately 67% compared with control tumors after 1-2 weeks. Moreover, these early effects could be translated into increased survival times of animals treated with neural progenitor cell grafts 3 days after intrastriatal tumor inoculation. In contrast, there was no activation or migration of endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neuroblasts in response to an intrastriatal syngeneic tumor. In conclusion, NPC possess the ability to influence tumor growth as well as respond to queues from the tumor or tumor microenvironment, demonstrating a cross-talk between the cells. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vectors, lentiviral, subventricular zone, neural progenitor cells, gliomas
in
Journal of Neuroscience Research
volume
85
issue
10
pages
2147 - 2159
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000248516700009
  • scopus:34547396471
ISSN
1097-4547
DOI
10.1002/jnr.21344
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1e0d8233-f3db-4f64-8ffd-b21fc619cb29 (old id 168078)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17526014&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-17 09:52:41
date last changed
2017-06-18 04:25:49
@article{1e0d8233-f3db-4f64-8ffd-b21fc619cb29,
  abstract     = {Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and offer a poor prognosis in patients because of their infiltrative and treatment-resistant nature. The median survival time after diagnosis is approximately 11-12 months. There is a strong need for novel treatment modalities in targeting gliomas, and recent advances use neural progenitor cells as delivery systems for different therapeutic strategies. In this study, we show that rat embryonic neural progenitor cell (NPC) lines, transplanted at a distant site from a 3-day-preestablished glioma in the striatum, were able to migrate toward and colocalize with tumor isles without general spread into the brain parenchyma. Upon encounter with tumor, neural progenitor cells changed phenotype and became vimentin positive. These results demonstrate that transplanted neural progenitor cells respond to queues from a tumor and home to and exert an antitumor effect on the preestablished glioma, significantly decreasing the tumor volume with approximately 67% compared with control tumors after 1-2 weeks. Moreover, these early effects could be translated into increased survival times of animals treated with neural progenitor cell grafts 3 days after intrastriatal tumor inoculation. In contrast, there was no activation or migration of endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neuroblasts in response to an intrastriatal syngeneic tumor. In conclusion, NPC possess the ability to influence tumor growth as well as respond to queues from the tumor or tumor microenvironment, demonstrating a cross-talk between the cells. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Staflin, Karin and Lindvall, Magnus and Zuchner, Thole and Lundberg, Cecilia},
  issn         = {1097-4547},
  keyword      = {vectors,lentiviral,subventricular zone,neural progenitor cells,gliomas},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2147--2159},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Neuroscience Research},
  title        = {Instructive cross-talk between neural progenitor cells and gliomas.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.21344},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2007},
}