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Cognitive function in young adults following intrauterine growth restriction with abnormal fetal aortic blood flow.

Tideman, Eva LU ; Marsal, Karel LU and Ley, David LU (2007) In Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology 29(6). p.614-618
Abstract
Objective

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a recognized risk factor for neurological deficits later in life. Abnormal fetal blood flow in the presence of IUGR helps to distinguish fetuses with true growth impairment from those that are small but normally grown. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of IUGR with abnormal fetal blood flow on cognitive function and psychological development in young adults.

Methods

Cognitive capacity (Wechsler adult intelligence scale-III (WAIS-III)) and psychological development (symptom check-list and Wender Utah rating scale) were evaluated at 18 years of age in 19 subjects who had had IUGR (abnormal fetal blood flow in the descending aorta and birth weight... (More)
Objective

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a recognized risk factor for neurological deficits later in life. Abnormal fetal blood flow in the presence of IUGR helps to distinguish fetuses with true growth impairment from those that are small but normally grown. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of IUGR with abnormal fetal blood flow on cognitive function and psychological development in young adults.

Methods

Cognitive capacity (Wechsler adult intelligence scale-III (WAIS-III)) and psychological development (symptom check-list and Wender Utah rating scale) were evaluated at 18 years of age in 19 subjects who had had IUGR (abnormal fetal blood flow in the descending aorta and birth weight small-for-gestational age) and in 23 control subjects who had had normal fetal aortic blood flow and birth weight appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA). School grades at 16 years of age were also recorded.

Results

The IUGR subjects had significantly lower results at 18 years of age in the combined subtests of the WAIS-III measuring executive cognitive functions (P = 0.03) and lower school grades at 16 years of age (P = 0.03) compared with the AGA group. IUGR subjects did not exhibit significantly more psychological distress symptoms.

Conclusion

IUGR with abnormal fetal blood flow is associated with impaired executive cognitive function in young adults. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fetal blood flow, long-term follow-up, psychological development, intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, cognitive outcome
in
Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
volume
29
issue
6
pages
614 - 618
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000247301500003
  • scopus:34250899168
ISSN
1469-0705
DOI
10.1002/uog.4042
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
abeb6f61-b33d-482e-8c65-04de5723e82b (old id 168103)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 16:47:05
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:59:03
@article{abeb6f61-b33d-482e-8c65-04de5723e82b,
  abstract     = {Objective<br/><br>
Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a recognized risk factor for neurological deficits later in life. Abnormal fetal blood flow in the presence of IUGR helps to distinguish fetuses with true growth impairment from those that are small but normally grown. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of IUGR with abnormal fetal blood flow on cognitive function and psychological development in young adults.<br/><br>
Methods<br/><br>
Cognitive capacity (Wechsler adult intelligence scale-III (WAIS-III)) and psychological development (symptom check-list and Wender Utah rating scale) were evaluated at 18 years of age in 19 subjects who had had IUGR (abnormal fetal blood flow in the descending aorta and birth weight small-for-gestational age) and in 23 control subjects who had had normal fetal aortic blood flow and birth weight appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA). School grades at 16 years of age were also recorded.<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
The IUGR subjects had significantly lower results at 18 years of age in the combined subtests of the WAIS-III measuring executive cognitive functions (P = 0.03) and lower school grades at 16 years of age (P = 0.03) compared with the AGA group. IUGR subjects did not exhibit significantly more psychological distress symptoms.<br/><br>
Conclusion<br/><br>
IUGR with abnormal fetal blood flow is associated with impaired executive cognitive function in young adults.},
  author       = {Tideman, Eva and Marsal, Karel and Ley, David},
  issn         = {1469-0705},
  keyword      = {fetal blood flow,long-term follow-up,psychological development,intrauterine growth restriction,small for gestational age,cognitive outcome},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {614--618},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology},
  title        = {Cognitive function in young adults following intrauterine growth restriction with abnormal fetal aortic blood flow.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/uog.4042},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2007},
}