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Social capital, political trust, and health locus of control: A population-based study.

Lindström, Martin LU (2011) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Okt. p.3-9
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between political trust in the Riksdag and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control), taking horizontal trust into account. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample of 28,198 persons aged 18-80 years participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between political trust in the Riksdag (an aspect of vertical trust) and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth,... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between political trust in the Riksdag and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control), taking horizontal trust into account. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample of 28,198 persons aged 18-80 years participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between political trust in the Riksdag (an aspect of vertical trust) and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, and horizontal trust in other people. RESULTS: A 33.7% of all men and 31.8% of all women lack internal locus of control. Low (external) health locus of control is more common in higher age groups, among people born outside Sweden, with lower education, low horizontal trust, low political trust, and no opinion concerning political trust. Respondents with not particularly strong political trust, no political trust at all and no opinion have significantly higher odds ratios of external locus of control throughout the multiple regression analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Low political trust in the Riksdag seems to be independently associated with external health locus of control. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
Okt
pages
3 - 9
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000286610700002
  • PMID:20846998
  • Scopus:79952260632
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494810382811
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6a9023b0-ec10-4bde-8fc3-0031acdf8615 (old id 1688145)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20846998?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-10-06 07:35:16
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:51:24
@article{6a9023b0-ec10-4bde-8fc3-0031acdf8615,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between political trust in the Riksdag and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control), taking horizontal trust into account. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample of 28,198 persons aged 18-80 years participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between political trust in the Riksdag (an aspect of vertical trust) and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, and horizontal trust in other people. RESULTS: A 33.7% of all men and 31.8% of all women lack internal locus of control. Low (external) health locus of control is more common in higher age groups, among people born outside Sweden, with lower education, low horizontal trust, low political trust, and no opinion concerning political trust. Respondents with not particularly strong political trust, no political trust at all and no opinion have significantly higher odds ratios of external locus of control throughout the multiple regression analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Low political trust in the Riksdag seems to be independently associated with external health locus of control.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3--9},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Social capital, political trust, and health locus of control: A population-based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494810382811},
  volume       = {Okt},
  year         = {2011},
}