Advanced

Parental history and venous thromboembolism: a nationwide study of age and sex-specific familial risks in Sweden.

Zöller, Bengt LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2011) In Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 9(1). p.64-70
Abstract
Background: The value of parental history as a risk indicator for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been determined in a nationwide setting. Objectives: This is the first nationwide study of age and sex specific familial VTE risks in offspring of parents hospitalized for VTE. Patients/Methods: The Swedish Multigeneration Register of 0-75-year-old subjects was linked to the Hospital Discharge Register for 1987-2007. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for individuals whose parents were hospitalized for VTE compared to those whose parents were unaffected. Results: Among 45,362 hospitalized offspring cases with VTE, 4865 offspring of affected parents were identified with a familial SIR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.94-2.05). Familial... (More)
Background: The value of parental history as a risk indicator for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been determined in a nationwide setting. Objectives: This is the first nationwide study of age and sex specific familial VTE risks in offspring of parents hospitalized for VTE. Patients/Methods: The Swedish Multigeneration Register of 0-75-year-old subjects was linked to the Hospital Discharge Register for 1987-2007. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for individuals whose parents were hospitalized for VTE compared to those whose parents were unaffected. Results: Among 45,362 hospitalized offspring cases with VTE, 4865 offspring of affected parents were identified with a familial SIR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.94-2.05). Familial SIR was slightly higher for male offspring than for female offspring (2.08, 95% CI 2.00-2.16 vs. 1.91, 95% CI 1.84-1.99). The risk in offspring was further increased when both parents were affected (3.97, 95% CI 3.40-4.61), with high familial risks at ages 20-29 years (10.00, 95% CI 5.91-15.84). The familial risks for VTE among offspring were increased from the age of 10 up to 75 years, with a familial SIR of 3.96 (95% CI 3.13-4.94) at ages 10-19 years and 1.48 (95% CI 1.17-1.84) at age 70-75. However, the absolute incidence rate increased with age. Conclusions: Parental history is potentially useful for risk assessments of VTE, although age needs to be considered. Our results support the use of an age-dependent multicausal model to estimate the risk of VTE. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
venous thrombosis, thromboembolism, venous, risk factors, family history, age, epidemiology
in
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis
volume
9
issue
1
pages
64 - 70
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000286055500010
  • pmid:20942849
  • scopus:78650951814
ISSN
1538-7933
DOI
10.1111/j.1538-7836.2010.04107.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a2c6b77-10d1-4b60-874b-7e025d37454d (old id 1711239)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20942849?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-11-05 13:25:07
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:38:15
@article{0a2c6b77-10d1-4b60-874b-7e025d37454d,
  abstract     = {Background: The value of parental history as a risk indicator for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been determined in a nationwide setting. Objectives: This is the first nationwide study of age and sex specific familial VTE risks in offspring of parents hospitalized for VTE. Patients/Methods: The Swedish Multigeneration Register of 0-75-year-old subjects was linked to the Hospital Discharge Register for 1987-2007. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for individuals whose parents were hospitalized for VTE compared to those whose parents were unaffected. Results: Among 45,362 hospitalized offspring cases with VTE, 4865 offspring of affected parents were identified with a familial SIR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.94-2.05). Familial SIR was slightly higher for male offspring than for female offspring (2.08, 95% CI 2.00-2.16 vs. 1.91, 95% CI 1.84-1.99). The risk in offspring was further increased when both parents were affected (3.97, 95% CI 3.40-4.61), with high familial risks at ages 20-29 years (10.00, 95% CI 5.91-15.84). The familial risks for VTE among offspring were increased from the age of 10 up to 75 years, with a familial SIR of 3.96 (95% CI 3.13-4.94) at ages 10-19 years and 1.48 (95% CI 1.17-1.84) at age 70-75. However, the absolute incidence rate increased with age. Conclusions: Parental history is potentially useful for risk assessments of VTE, although age needs to be considered. Our results support the use of an age-dependent multicausal model to estimate the risk of VTE.},
  author       = {Zöller, Bengt and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1538-7933},
  keyword      = {venous thrombosis,thromboembolism,venous,risk factors,family history,age,epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {64--70},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis},
  title        = {Parental history and venous thromboembolism: a nationwide study of age and sex-specific familial risks in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1538-7836.2010.04107.x},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2011},
}