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Algal MIPs

Danielson, Jonas LU ; Anderberg, Hanna LU and Johanson, Urban LU (2010)
Abstract
Background

Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also named aquaporins form channels that facilitate the passive

transport of water and/or other small polar but uncharged molecules across membranes. MIPs are

particularly abundant and diversified in terrestrial plants but little is known about their

evolutionary history. In order to shed light upon the origin of the plant MIP subfamilies 9 algal

genomes were searched for MIP encoding genes.



Results

A total of 22 MIPs were identified in the analysed genomes and phylogenetic analyses classified

them into seven subfamilies. At least two of these, Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs)

and Glp F-like... (More)
Background

Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also named aquaporins form channels that facilitate the passive

transport of water and/or other small polar but uncharged molecules across membranes. MIPs are

particularly abundant and diversified in terrestrial plants but little is known about their

evolutionary history. In order to shed light upon the origin of the plant MIP subfamilies 9 algal

genomes were searched for MIP encoding genes.



Results

A total of 22 MIPs were identified in the analysed genomes and phylogenetic analyses classified

them into seven subfamilies. At least two of these, Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs)

and Glp F-like Intrinsic Proteins (GIPs), are also present in land plants and divergence dating

support that they had formed before terrestrial plants evolved. The other subfamilies were named

MIPA to MIPE to facilitate the use of a common nomenclature for plant MIPs reflecting

phylogenetically stable groups. All of the investigated genomes contained at least one MIP gene

and only in a few of the species with more than one gene the encoded MIPs belonged to different

subfamilies.



Conclusions

Our results suggest that most green algae have at least one MIP and often only from one type of

subfamily. In spite of this the total variation in MIPs and the expected number of different

subfamilies is likely to be even higher than what has been found in higher plants Further studies

are need to discern the function of the algal specific subfamilies MIPA-E. This work provides the

first framework for a systematic investigation of the physiological role of these diverse MIPs. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Working Paper
publication status
unpublished
subject
pages
41 pages
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
11d5c4ea-d006-4441-a714-d9c285395d2f (old id 1714737)
date added to LUP
2010-11-09 14:06:15
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:14:58
@misc{11d5c4ea-d006-4441-a714-d9c285395d2f,
  abstract     = {Background<br/><br>
Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also named aquaporins form channels that facilitate the passive<br/><br>
transport of water and/or other small polar but uncharged molecules across membranes. MIPs are<br/><br>
particularly abundant and diversified in terrestrial plants but little is known about their<br/><br>
evolutionary history. In order to shed light upon the origin of the plant MIP subfamilies 9 algal<br/><br>
genomes were searched for MIP encoding genes.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
A total of 22 MIPs were identified in the analysed genomes and phylogenetic analyses classified<br/><br>
them into seven subfamilies. At least two of these, Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs)<br/><br>
and Glp F-like Intrinsic Proteins (GIPs), are also present in land plants and divergence dating<br/><br>
support that they had formed before terrestrial plants evolved. The other subfamilies were named<br/><br>
MIPA to MIPE to facilitate the use of a common nomenclature for plant MIPs reflecting<br/><br>
phylogenetically stable groups. All of the investigated genomes contained at least one MIP gene<br/><br>
and only in a few of the species with more than one gene the encoded MIPs belonged to different<br/><br>
subfamilies.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions<br/><br>
Our results suggest that most green algae have at least one MIP and often only from one type of<br/><br>
subfamily. In spite of this the total variation in MIPs and the expected number of different<br/><br>
subfamilies is likely to be even higher than what has been found in higher plants Further studies<br/><br>
are need to discern the function of the algal specific subfamilies MIPA-E. This work provides the<br/><br>
first framework for a systematic investigation of the physiological role of these diverse MIPs.},
  author       = {Danielson, Jonas and Anderberg, Hanna and Johanson, Urban},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Working Paper},
  pages        = {41},
  title        = {Algal MIPs},
  year         = {2010},
}