Advanced

Dietary quinic acid supplied as the nutritional supplement AIO + AC-11® leads to induction of micromolar levels of nicotinamide and tryptophan in the urine.

Pero, Ronald LU and Lund, Harald LU (2011) In Phytotherapy Research 25(6). p.851-857
Abstract
Hippuric acid is synthesized and produced primarily by the gastrointestinal (GI) microflora. However, there is no known health benefit for hippuric acid except its catabolic conjugation of benzene-type compounds via glycine and subsequent excretion in the urine. For years the GI tract microflora were known to metabolize quinic acid to hippuric acid. Recently it was also proposed that DNA repair was strongly enhanced by quinic acid. In order to explain these quinic acid effects, Pero and colleagues have examined whether tryptophan and nicotinamide were also enhanced by quinic acid levels in urine. They were indeed, and so another study was designed using a natural supplement source of quinic acid called AIO + AC-11®, and then the effects of... (More)
Hippuric acid is synthesized and produced primarily by the gastrointestinal (GI) microflora. However, there is no known health benefit for hippuric acid except its catabolic conjugation of benzene-type compounds via glycine and subsequent excretion in the urine. For years the GI tract microflora were known to metabolize quinic acid to hippuric acid. Recently it was also proposed that DNA repair was strongly enhanced by quinic acid. In order to explain these quinic acid effects, Pero and colleagues have examined whether tryptophan and nicotinamide were also enhanced by quinic acid levels in urine. They were indeed, and so another study was designed using a natural supplement source of quinic acid called AIO + AC-11®, and then the effects of intervention were measured after only 21 days. It was possible to show profound increases in quinic acid that were again paralleled by increases in tryptophan and nicotinamide urinary levels. Because the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods differed greatly between the two studies, differences in chemical analyses probably did not contribute to the data base. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
gastrointestinal microflora, HPLC, urine levels, nicotinamide, quinic acid, tryptophan
in
Phytotherapy Research
volume
25
issue
6
pages
851 - 857
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000291060700011
  • pmid:21104945
  • scopus:79957860575
ISSN
1099-1573
DOI
10.1002/ptr.3348
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
429c47ae-e70d-4aae-a61d-c5f163c0f8b5 (old id 1731589)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21104945?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-02-17 10:22:13
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:23:36
@article{429c47ae-e70d-4aae-a61d-c5f163c0f8b5,
  abstract     = {Hippuric acid is synthesized and produced primarily by the gastrointestinal (GI) microflora. However, there is no known health benefit for hippuric acid except its catabolic conjugation of benzene-type compounds via glycine and subsequent excretion in the urine. For years the GI tract microflora were known to metabolize quinic acid to hippuric acid. Recently it was also proposed that DNA repair was strongly enhanced by quinic acid. In order to explain these quinic acid effects, Pero and colleagues have examined whether tryptophan and nicotinamide were also enhanced by quinic acid levels in urine. They were indeed, and so another study was designed using a natural supplement source of quinic acid called AIO + AC-11®, and then the effects of intervention were measured after only 21 days. It was possible to show profound increases in quinic acid that were again paralleled by increases in tryptophan and nicotinamide urinary levels. Because the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods differed greatly between the two studies, differences in chemical analyses probably did not contribute to the data base. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Pero, Ronald and Lund, Harald},
  issn         = {1099-1573},
  keyword      = {gastrointestinal microflora,HPLC,urine levels,nicotinamide,quinic acid,tryptophan},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {851--857},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Phytotherapy Research},
  title        = {Dietary quinic acid supplied as the nutritional supplement AIO + AC-11® leads to induction of micromolar levels of nicotinamide and tryptophan in the urine.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3348},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2011},
}