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Risk of second cancers after the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma in Scandinavia.

Bzhalava, Davit LU ; Bray, F; Storm, H and Dillner, Joakim LU (2011) In British Journal of Cancer 104. p.178-180
Abstract
Background:Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin that has been associated with a new tumour virus, the MCC polyomavirus.Methods:To investigate whether MCC may have a shared aetiology with other cancers, we investigated the risk of second cancers after the diagnosis of MCC using the national cancer registries in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.Results:The overall cancer incidence was increased among patients diagnosed with MCC compared with the general population in these countries (79 secondary cancers total, Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.72); 49 secondary cancer in females, SIR 1.7 (95% CI: 1.29-2.25); 30 secondary cancers in males and SIR 1.05 (95% CI:... (More)
Background:Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin that has been associated with a new tumour virus, the MCC polyomavirus.Methods:To investigate whether MCC may have a shared aetiology with other cancers, we investigated the risk of second cancers after the diagnosis of MCC using the national cancer registries in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.Results:The overall cancer incidence was increased among patients diagnosed with MCC compared with the general population in these countries (79 secondary cancers total, Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.72); 49 secondary cancer in females, SIR 1.7 (95% CI: 1.29-2.25); 30 secondary cancers in males and SIR 1.05 (95% CI: 0.73-1.5)). There were significantly increased incidence ratios for non-melanoma skin cancers (34 secondary cancers, SIR 8.35 (95% CI: 5.97-11.68)), melanoma of skin (6 secondary cancers, SIR 4.29 (95% CI: 1.93-9.56)) and laryngeal cancer (2 secondary cancers, SIR 9.51 (95% CI: 2.38-38)). The SIRs for these three cancer sites were also elevated on restricting the follow-up to cancers occurring at least one year after MCC diagnosis.Conclusions:Patients diagnosed with MCC are at increased risk of a second cancer, particularly, other skin cancers. Conceivable explanations include the impact of increased surveillance of the skin and shared causative factors, for example, ultraviolet light exposure or MCC polyomavirus infection.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 16 November 2010; doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605989 www.bjcancer.com. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
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published
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in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
104
pages
178 - 180
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000285915900025
  • pmid:21081931
  • scopus:78650857645
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605989
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
17dd18cf-3ba0-47c7-af4a-00bd0aee4579 (old id 1731881)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21081931?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-12-01 12:22:57
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:30:05
@article{17dd18cf-3ba0-47c7-af4a-00bd0aee4579,
  abstract     = {Background:Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin that has been associated with a new tumour virus, the MCC polyomavirus.Methods:To investigate whether MCC may have a shared aetiology with other cancers, we investigated the risk of second cancers after the diagnosis of MCC using the national cancer registries in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.Results:The overall cancer incidence was increased among patients diagnosed with MCC compared with the general population in these countries (79 secondary cancers total, Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.72); 49 secondary cancer in females, SIR 1.7 (95% CI: 1.29-2.25); 30 secondary cancers in males and SIR 1.05 (95% CI: 0.73-1.5)). There were significantly increased incidence ratios for non-melanoma skin cancers (34 secondary cancers, SIR 8.35 (95% CI: 5.97-11.68)), melanoma of skin (6 secondary cancers, SIR 4.29 (95% CI: 1.93-9.56)) and laryngeal cancer (2 secondary cancers, SIR 9.51 (95% CI: 2.38-38)). The SIRs for these three cancer sites were also elevated on restricting the follow-up to cancers occurring at least one year after MCC diagnosis.Conclusions:Patients diagnosed with MCC are at increased risk of a second cancer, particularly, other skin cancers. Conceivable explanations include the impact of increased surveillance of the skin and shared causative factors, for example, ultraviolet light exposure or MCC polyomavirus infection.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 16 November 2010; doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605989 www.bjcancer.com.},
  author       = {Bzhalava, Davit and Bray, F and Storm, H and Dillner, Joakim},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {178--180},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Risk of second cancers after the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma in Scandinavia.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6605989},
  volume       = {104},
  year         = {2011},
}