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Fast growth associated with aberrant vasculature and hypoxia in fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) over-expressing PC-3 prostate tumour xenografts

Tuomela, Johanna; Gronroos, Tove J.; Valta, Maija P.; Sandholm, Jouko; Schrey, Aleksi; Seppanen, Jani; Marjamaki, Paivi; Forsback, Sarita; Kinnunen, Ilpo and Solin, Olof, et al. (2010) In BMC Cancer 10.
Abstract
Background: Prostate tumours are commonly poorly oxygenated which is associated with tumour progression and development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy. Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is a mitogenic and angiogenic factor, which is expressed at an increased level in human prostate tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis. We studied the effect of FGF8b on tumour oxygenation and growth parameters in xenografts in comparison with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-expressing xenografts, representing another fast growing and angiogenic tumour model. Methods: Subcutaneous tumours of PC-3 cells transfected with FGF8b, VEGF or empty (mock) vectors were produced and studied for vascularity, cell... (More)
Background: Prostate tumours are commonly poorly oxygenated which is associated with tumour progression and development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy. Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is a mitogenic and angiogenic factor, which is expressed at an increased level in human prostate tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis. We studied the effect of FGF8b on tumour oxygenation and growth parameters in xenografts in comparison with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-expressing xenografts, representing another fast growing and angiogenic tumour model. Methods: Subcutaneous tumours of PC-3 cells transfected with FGF8b, VEGF or empty (mock) vectors were produced and studied for vascularity, cell proliferation, glucose metabolism and oxygenation. Tumours were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), flow cytometry, use of radiolabelled markers of energy metabolism ([F-18] FDG) and hypoxia ([F-18] EF5), and intratumoral polarographic measurements of pO(2). Results: Both FGF8b and VEGF tumours grew rapidly in nude mice and showed highly vascularised morphology. Perfusion studies, pO(2) measurements, [F-18] EF5 and [F-18] FDG uptake as well as IHC staining for glucose transport protein (GLUT1) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1 showed that VEGF xenografts were well-perfused and oxygenised, as expected, whereas FGF8b tumours were as hypoxic as mock tumours. These results suggest that FGF8b-induced tumour capillaries are defective. Nevertheless, the growth rate of hypoxic FGF8b tumours was highly increased, as that of well-oxygenised VEGF tumours, when compared with hypoxic mock tumour controls. Conclusion: FGF8b is able to induce fast growth in strongly hypoxic tumour microenvironment whereas VEGF-stimulated growth advantage is associated with improved perfusion and oxygenation of prostate tumour xenografts. (Less)
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BMC Cancer
volume
10
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BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000284167100001
  • scopus:77958599957
ISSN
1471-2407
DOI
10.1186/1471-2407-10-596
language
English
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a433219e-c1ce-4b00-a1da-ff8c0bf2ff98 (old id 1753427)
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2011-01-04 08:12:07
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@article{a433219e-c1ce-4b00-a1da-ff8c0bf2ff98,
  abstract     = {Background: Prostate tumours are commonly poorly oxygenated which is associated with tumour progression and development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy. Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is a mitogenic and angiogenic factor, which is expressed at an increased level in human prostate tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis. We studied the effect of FGF8b on tumour oxygenation and growth parameters in xenografts in comparison with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-expressing xenografts, representing another fast growing and angiogenic tumour model. Methods: Subcutaneous tumours of PC-3 cells transfected with FGF8b, VEGF or empty (mock) vectors were produced and studied for vascularity, cell proliferation, glucose metabolism and oxygenation. Tumours were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), flow cytometry, use of radiolabelled markers of energy metabolism ([F-18] FDG) and hypoxia ([F-18] EF5), and intratumoral polarographic measurements of pO(2). Results: Both FGF8b and VEGF tumours grew rapidly in nude mice and showed highly vascularised morphology. Perfusion studies, pO(2) measurements, [F-18] EF5 and [F-18] FDG uptake as well as IHC staining for glucose transport protein (GLUT1) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1 showed that VEGF xenografts were well-perfused and oxygenised, as expected, whereas FGF8b tumours were as hypoxic as mock tumours. These results suggest that FGF8b-induced tumour capillaries are defective. Nevertheless, the growth rate of hypoxic FGF8b tumours was highly increased, as that of well-oxygenised VEGF tumours, when compared with hypoxic mock tumour controls. Conclusion: FGF8b is able to induce fast growth in strongly hypoxic tumour microenvironment whereas VEGF-stimulated growth advantage is associated with improved perfusion and oxygenation of prostate tumour xenografts.},
  author       = {Tuomela, Johanna and Gronroos, Tove J. and Valta, Maija P. and Sandholm, Jouko and Schrey, Aleksi and Seppanen, Jani and Marjamaki, Paivi and Forsback, Sarita and Kinnunen, Ilpo and Solin, Olof and Minn, Heikki and Härkönen, Pirkko},
  issn         = {1471-2407},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Cancer},
  title        = {Fast growth associated with aberrant vasculature and hypoxia in fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) over-expressing PC-3 prostate tumour xenografts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-10-596},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2010},
}