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Anger, depression and anxiety associated with endothelial function in childhood and adolescence

Osika, W.; Montgomery, S. M.; Dangardt, F.; Wahrborg, P.; Gan, L. M.; Tideman, Eva LU and Friberg, P. (2011) In Archives of Disease in Childhood 96(1). p.38-43
Abstract
Objective Psychosocial adversity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. The authors assessed associations of reactive hyperaemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), a measure of endothelial function predictive of CVD, with self-assessed psychological health among school children. Methods A total of 248 healthy school children (mean (SD) age 14.0 (1.0); 136 girls and 112 boys) underwent RH-PAT testing. They completed the Beck Youth Inventories (BYI) of emotional and social impairment scales, which is used to screen for depression, anxiety, anger and disruptive behaviour. Results No sex differences were observed for the RH-PAT score. Statistically significant differences were observed for the BYI scores; girls had... (More)
Objective Psychosocial adversity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. The authors assessed associations of reactive hyperaemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), a measure of endothelial function predictive of CVD, with self-assessed psychological health among school children. Methods A total of 248 healthy school children (mean (SD) age 14.0 (1.0); 136 girls and 112 boys) underwent RH-PAT testing. They completed the Beck Youth Inventories (BYI) of emotional and social impairment scales, which is used to screen for depression, anxiety, anger and disruptive behaviour. Results No sex differences were observed for the RH-PAT score. Statistically significant differences were observed for the BYI scores; girls had higher scores for depression, anger and anxiety. Among the girls, there were statistically significant associations between lower RH-PAT scores and higher scores for anger (B coefficient=-0.100, p=0.040), depression (-0.108, p=0.009) and anxiety (-0.138, p=0.039) after adjustment for age. Among the boys, disruptive behaviour was associated with higher RH-PAT scores (0.09, p=0.006). Conclusions The girls have higher levels of self-assessed anger; depression and anxiety compared with the boys, and these characteristics are associated with lower RH-PAT scores, indicating attenuated endothelial function. Among the boys, disruptive behaviour was associated with better endothelial function. Although psychological ill-health is associated with impaired endothelial function and CVD among adults, such processes may also be relevant to children. Psychosocial adversity in childhood might be a risk factor for subsequent CVD. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Disease in Childhood
volume
96
issue
1
pages
38 - 43
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000285389200009
  • scopus:78650827040
ISSN
0003-9888
DOI
10.1136/adc.2008.152777
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ea85b2af-26c4-45cf-8d2f-79e820ec8259 (old id 1774041)
date added to LUP
2011-02-01 10:11:19
date last changed
2017-09-03 04:19:36
@article{ea85b2af-26c4-45cf-8d2f-79e820ec8259,
  abstract     = {Objective Psychosocial adversity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. The authors assessed associations of reactive hyperaemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), a measure of endothelial function predictive of CVD, with self-assessed psychological health among school children. Methods A total of 248 healthy school children (mean (SD) age 14.0 (1.0); 136 girls and 112 boys) underwent RH-PAT testing. They completed the Beck Youth Inventories (BYI) of emotional and social impairment scales, which is used to screen for depression, anxiety, anger and disruptive behaviour. Results No sex differences were observed for the RH-PAT score. Statistically significant differences were observed for the BYI scores; girls had higher scores for depression, anger and anxiety. Among the girls, there were statistically significant associations between lower RH-PAT scores and higher scores for anger (B coefficient=-0.100, p=0.040), depression (-0.108, p=0.009) and anxiety (-0.138, p=0.039) after adjustment for age. Among the boys, disruptive behaviour was associated with higher RH-PAT scores (0.09, p=0.006). Conclusions The girls have higher levels of self-assessed anger; depression and anxiety compared with the boys, and these characteristics are associated with lower RH-PAT scores, indicating attenuated endothelial function. Among the boys, disruptive behaviour was associated with better endothelial function. Although psychological ill-health is associated with impaired endothelial function and CVD among adults, such processes may also be relevant to children. Psychosocial adversity in childhood might be a risk factor for subsequent CVD.},
  author       = {Osika, W. and Montgomery, S. M. and Dangardt, F. and Wahrborg, P. and Gan, L. M. and Tideman, Eva and Friberg, P.},
  issn         = {0003-9888},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {38--43},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Archives of Disease in Childhood},
  title        = {Anger, depression and anxiety associated with endothelial function in childhood and adolescence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/adc.2008.152777},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2011},
}