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Changes in Arctic marine bacterial carbon metabolism in response to increasing temperature

Kritzberg, Emma LU ; Duarte, Carlos M. and Wassmann, Paul (2010) In Polar Biology 33(12). p.1673-1682
Abstract
Arctic areas of deep-water convection have a large potential for export of organic carbon from surface waters into the deep sea and, therefore, are an important part of the global carbon cycle. As the Arctic is reportedly heating up faster than any other part of the planet, temperature-driven changes in the biogeochemical cycling in these areas can be very significant. Here, we study the regulation of bacterial carbon metabolism, which process vast amounts of organic carbon, by temperature and the availability of resources. The response of bacterial production and respiration of natural bacterial assemblages from the Fram Strait was studied by experimental manipulations of temperature and resources in combination. Both bacterial production... (More)
Arctic areas of deep-water convection have a large potential for export of organic carbon from surface waters into the deep sea and, therefore, are an important part of the global carbon cycle. As the Arctic is reportedly heating up faster than any other part of the planet, temperature-driven changes in the biogeochemical cycling in these areas can be very significant. Here, we study the regulation of bacterial carbon metabolism, which process vast amounts of organic carbon, by temperature and the availability of resources. The response of bacterial production and respiration of natural bacterial assemblages from the Fram Strait was studied by experimental manipulations of temperature and resources in combination. Both bacterial production and respiration were enhanced by temperature so that the total bacterial carbon demand increased sixfold following a temperature increase of 6A degrees C. Respiration responded more strongly than production so that bacterial growth efficiency decreased with increasing temperature. Although neither production nor respiration was limited by resource availability under in situ conditions, the response to temperature was higher in resource-amended treatments, indicative of a substrate-temperature interaction regulating both components of bacterial metabolism. In conclusion, the results show that warming can result in a substantial increase of the carbon flow through bacteria and that most of the carbon consumed would be released as CO2. Moreover, the results suggest that both temperature and availability of resources need to be considered to accurately be able to predict changes in bacterial carbon metabolism in response to climate change. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Temperature effects, Arctic, Carbon cycling, efficiency, Bacterial growth, Bacterial respiration, Bacterial production
in
Polar Biology
volume
33
issue
12
pages
1673 - 1682
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000286392500008
  • scopus:78751582297
ISSN
1432-2056
DOI
10.1007/s00300-010-0799-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
56164d59-91d5-461b-a432-2397aaaa98cb (old id 1810922)
date added to LUP
2011-03-16 14:32:00
date last changed
2018-06-17 03:23:39
@article{56164d59-91d5-461b-a432-2397aaaa98cb,
  abstract     = {Arctic areas of deep-water convection have a large potential for export of organic carbon from surface waters into the deep sea and, therefore, are an important part of the global carbon cycle. As the Arctic is reportedly heating up faster than any other part of the planet, temperature-driven changes in the biogeochemical cycling in these areas can be very significant. Here, we study the regulation of bacterial carbon metabolism, which process vast amounts of organic carbon, by temperature and the availability of resources. The response of bacterial production and respiration of natural bacterial assemblages from the Fram Strait was studied by experimental manipulations of temperature and resources in combination. Both bacterial production and respiration were enhanced by temperature so that the total bacterial carbon demand increased sixfold following a temperature increase of 6A degrees C. Respiration responded more strongly than production so that bacterial growth efficiency decreased with increasing temperature. Although neither production nor respiration was limited by resource availability under in situ conditions, the response to temperature was higher in resource-amended treatments, indicative of a substrate-temperature interaction regulating both components of bacterial metabolism. In conclusion, the results show that warming can result in a substantial increase of the carbon flow through bacteria and that most of the carbon consumed would be released as CO2. Moreover, the results suggest that both temperature and availability of resources need to be considered to accurately be able to predict changes in bacterial carbon metabolism in response to climate change.},
  author       = {Kritzberg, Emma and Duarte, Carlos M. and Wassmann, Paul},
  issn         = {1432-2056},
  keyword      = {Temperature effects,Arctic,Carbon cycling,efficiency,Bacterial growth,Bacterial respiration,Bacterial production},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1673--1682},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Polar Biology},
  title        = {Changes in Arctic marine bacterial carbon metabolism in response to increasing temperature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00300-010-0799-7},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2010},
}