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Country of birth, socioeconomic factors and risk factor control in patients with type 2 diabetes: A Swedish study from 25 primary health care centers.

Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Chaikiat, Åsa LU ; Ramírez León, Vania; Johansson, Sven-Erik LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2011) In Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews 27(3). p.244-254
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few large-scale studies have examined the association between sociodemographic factors and the probability of reaching the recommended levels of HbA1c and blood lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim was to investigate whether sociodemographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients affected the odds that they would reach recommended levels of blood lipids and HbA1c. METHODS: This study included 2912 men and 2136 women, aged 35-74, with diagnosed type 2 diabetes from 25 primary health care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. National population registers were linked to clinical data from electronic records and logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. RESULTS: Less than half of the diabetic men and women... (More)
BACKGROUND: Few large-scale studies have examined the association between sociodemographic factors and the probability of reaching the recommended levels of HbA1c and blood lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim was to investigate whether sociodemographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients affected the odds that they would reach recommended levels of blood lipids and HbA1c. METHODS: This study included 2912 men and 2136 women, aged 35-74, with diagnosed type 2 diabetes from 25 primary health care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. National population registers were linked to clinical data from electronic records and logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. RESULTS: Less than half of the diabetic men and women reached the recommended levels of HbA1c. Even fewer reached the recommended levels for total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. The gender differences favored women, for HbA1c, and men, for blood lipids. Individuals with the lowest income levels were less likely to reach the recommended level of HbA1c. Country of birth showed that immigrants from Middle Eastern countries and Other countries had lower odds of reaching the recommended levels of HbA1c. CONCLUSION: This study confirmed that risk factor control among patients with type 2 diabetes treated in primary health care is inadequate and that sociodemographic factors were associated with metabolic control. Future studies could include new strategies for the control of modifiable risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, primary health care, socioeconomic status
in
Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews
volume
27
issue
3
pages
244 - 254
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000288034300006
  • pmid:21309045
  • scopus:79952133239
ISSN
1520-7552
DOI
10.1002/dmrr.1161
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ee60d342-3eda-43e1-b6d6-26d310f9167e (old id 1831998)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21309045?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-03-01 14:31:35
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:15:08
@article{ee60d342-3eda-43e1-b6d6-26d310f9167e,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Few large-scale studies have examined the association between sociodemographic factors and the probability of reaching the recommended levels of HbA1c and blood lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim was to investigate whether sociodemographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients affected the odds that they would reach recommended levels of blood lipids and HbA1c. METHODS: This study included 2912 men and 2136 women, aged 35-74, with diagnosed type 2 diabetes from 25 primary health care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. National population registers were linked to clinical data from electronic records and logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. RESULTS: Less than half of the diabetic men and women reached the recommended levels of HbA1c. Even fewer reached the recommended levels for total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. The gender differences favored women, for HbA1c, and men, for blood lipids. Individuals with the lowest income levels were less likely to reach the recommended level of HbA1c. Country of birth showed that immigrants from Middle Eastern countries and Other countries had lower odds of reaching the recommended levels of HbA1c. CONCLUSION: This study confirmed that risk factor control among patients with type 2 diabetes treated in primary health care is inadequate and that sociodemographic factors were associated with metabolic control. Future studies could include new strategies for the control of modifiable risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Sundquist, Kristina and Chaikiat, Åsa and Ramírez León, Vania and Johansson, Sven-Erik and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1520-7552},
  keyword      = {hypercholesterolemia,diabetes mellitus,primary health care,socioeconomic status},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {244--254},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews},
  title        = {Country of birth, socioeconomic factors and risk factor control in patients with type 2 diabetes: A Swedish study from 25 primary health care centers.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.1161},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2011},
}