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Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

Chuang, Shu-Chun; Gallo, Valentina; Michaud, Dominique; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Romieu, Isabelle; Straif, Kurt; Palli, Domenico and Pala, Valeria, et al. (2011) In Cancer Causes and Control 22(3). p.487-494
Abstract
The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and... (More)
The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and adulthood ETS exposure. Models were further adjusted for reproductive factors for female cancers, for meat intake for digestive system cancers, and for diabetes status for pancreatic cancer. No association was observed between childhood ETS exposure and overall cancer risks (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), and for selected sites. The only exception was pancreatic cancer, as previously reported by Vrieling et al., among those who had been exposed daily in childhood (overall HR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.14-3.84). In conclusion, childhood ETS exposure might not be a major risk factor for common cancers in adulthood. (Less)
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Cancer Causes and Control
volume
22
issue
3
pages
487 - 494
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000288542400016
  • pmid:21279734
  • scopus:79955755665
ISSN
1573-7225
DOI
10.1007/s10552-010-9723-2
language
English
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yes
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278f4172-a689-437d-bab2-687d71b4466f (old id 1832532)
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21279734?dopt=Abstract
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2011-03-01 09:50:36
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2017-07-09 04:32:19
@article{278f4172-a689-437d-bab2-687d71b4466f,
  abstract     = {The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and adulthood ETS exposure. Models were further adjusted for reproductive factors for female cancers, for meat intake for digestive system cancers, and for diabetes status for pancreatic cancer. No association was observed between childhood ETS exposure and overall cancer risks (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), and for selected sites. The only exception was pancreatic cancer, as previously reported by Vrieling et al., among those who had been exposed daily in childhood (overall HR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.14-3.84). In conclusion, childhood ETS exposure might not be a major risk factor for common cancers in adulthood.},
  author       = {Chuang, Shu-Chun and Gallo, Valentina and Michaud, Dominique and Overvad, Kim and Tjønneland, Anne and Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise and Romieu, Isabelle and Straif, Kurt and Palli, Domenico and Pala, Valeria and Tumino, Rosario and Sacerdote, Carlotta and Panico, Salvatore and Peeters, Petra H and Lund, Eiliv and Gram, Inger Torhild and Manjer, Jonas and Borgquist, Signe and Riboli, Elio and Vineis, Paolo},
  issn         = {1573-7225},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {487--494},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cancer Causes and Control},
  title        = {Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9723-2},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2011},
}