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The need for speed in the management of haemophilia patients with inhibitors

Salek, S. Z.; Benson, G. M.; Elezovic, I.; Krenn, V.; Ljung, Rolf LU ; Morfini, M.; Remor, E.; Santagostino, E. and Sorensen, B. (2011) In Haemophilia 17(1). p.95-102
Abstract
Rapid control of bleeding is the key to reducing bleeding complications and thereby preserving joint and musculoskeletal function in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. However, this requires early diagnosis following the onset of bleeding and strategies for rapid treatment in an outpatient setting. Overarching themes on the need for speed in managing bleeds in haemophilia patients were examined by a panel of clinicians experienced in managing inhibitor patients and joint disease during the Third Zurich Haemophilia Forum on 8 May 2009. This report summarizes the opinions of the panel on how to achieve rapid bleeding control in inhibitor patients and areas that were identified by the panel for future research or as needing new consensus... (More)
Rapid control of bleeding is the key to reducing bleeding complications and thereby preserving joint and musculoskeletal function in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. However, this requires early diagnosis following the onset of bleeding and strategies for rapid treatment in an outpatient setting. Overarching themes on the need for speed in managing bleeds in haemophilia patients were examined by a panel of clinicians experienced in managing inhibitor patients and joint disease during the Third Zurich Haemophilia Forum on 8 May 2009. This report summarizes the opinions of the panel on how to achieve rapid bleeding control in inhibitor patients and areas that were identified by the panel for future research or as needing new consensus guidelines. The consensus was that home treatment should be established for haemophilia patients with inhibitors, as it is associated with a faster time to treatment, as well as improvements in the quality of life of patients and their carers. In addition, as improved haemostatic control now allows inhibitor patients to participate in a wider range of physical activities, specific guidelines are required on which types of sport and work are appropriate. It was agreed that clear, systematic approaches are needed for early diagnosis of joint and muscle bleeds in inhibitor patients, which could facilitate rapid treatment. There may be opportunities for exploiting new diagnostic techniques from osteoarthritis to enable earlier diagnosis of haemophilic arthropathy. Overall, it was concluded that greater emphasis should be placed on education and patients' psychological needs, to enable inhibitor patients to cope up more effectively with their disease. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
arthropathy, haemophilia, inhibitors, muscle bleed, quality of life, recombinant activated factor VII
in
Haemophilia
volume
17
issue
1
pages
95 - 102
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000285762900017
  • scopus:79951901925
ISSN
1351-8216
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2516.2010.02265.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
48a534bc-af98-4fa7-a0be-e6dfc3ec9493 (old id 1882554)
date added to LUP
2011-04-01 08:38:54
date last changed
2017-06-11 03:20:23
@article{48a534bc-af98-4fa7-a0be-e6dfc3ec9493,
  abstract     = {Rapid control of bleeding is the key to reducing bleeding complications and thereby preserving joint and musculoskeletal function in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. However, this requires early diagnosis following the onset of bleeding and strategies for rapid treatment in an outpatient setting. Overarching themes on the need for speed in managing bleeds in haemophilia patients were examined by a panel of clinicians experienced in managing inhibitor patients and joint disease during the Third Zurich Haemophilia Forum on 8 May 2009. This report summarizes the opinions of the panel on how to achieve rapid bleeding control in inhibitor patients and areas that were identified by the panel for future research or as needing new consensus guidelines. The consensus was that home treatment should be established for haemophilia patients with inhibitors, as it is associated with a faster time to treatment, as well as improvements in the quality of life of patients and their carers. In addition, as improved haemostatic control now allows inhibitor patients to participate in a wider range of physical activities, specific guidelines are required on which types of sport and work are appropriate. It was agreed that clear, systematic approaches are needed for early diagnosis of joint and muscle bleeds in inhibitor patients, which could facilitate rapid treatment. There may be opportunities for exploiting new diagnostic techniques from osteoarthritis to enable earlier diagnosis of haemophilic arthropathy. Overall, it was concluded that greater emphasis should be placed on education and patients' psychological needs, to enable inhibitor patients to cope up more effectively with their disease.},
  author       = {Salek, S. Z. and Benson, G. M. and Elezovic, I. and Krenn, V. and Ljung, Rolf and Morfini, M. and Remor, E. and Santagostino, E. and Sorensen, B.},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  keyword      = {arthropathy,haemophilia,inhibitors,muscle bleed,quality of life,recombinant activated factor VII},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {95--102},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {The need for speed in the management of haemophilia patients with inhibitors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2516.2010.02265.x},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2011},
}