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Nocturnal body temperature in wintering blue tits is affected by roost-site temperature and body reserves.

Nord, Andreas LU ; Nilsson, Johan LU and Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU (2011) In Oecologia 167. p.21-25
Abstract
Birds commonly use rest-phase hypothermia, a controlled reduction of body temperature (T (b)), to conserve energy during times of high metabolic demands. We assessed the flexibility of this heterothermic strategy by increasing roost-site temperature and recording the subsequent T (b) changes in wintering blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus L.), assuming that blue tits would respond to treatment by increasing T (b). We found that birds increased T (b) when roost-site temperature was increased, but only at low ambient temperatures. Moreover, birds with larger fat reserves regulated T (b) at higher levels than birds carrying less fat. This result implies that a roosting blue tit maintains its T (b) at the highest affordable level, as determined by... (More)
Birds commonly use rest-phase hypothermia, a controlled reduction of body temperature (T (b)), to conserve energy during times of high metabolic demands. We assessed the flexibility of this heterothermic strategy by increasing roost-site temperature and recording the subsequent T (b) changes in wintering blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus L.), assuming that blue tits would respond to treatment by increasing T (b). We found that birds increased T (b) when roost-site temperature was increased, but only at low ambient temperatures. Moreover, birds with larger fat reserves regulated T (b) at higher levels than birds carrying less fat. This result implies that a roosting blue tit maintains its T (b) at the highest affordable level, as determined by the interacting effect of ecophysiological costs associated with rest-phase hypothermia and energy reserves, in order to minimize potential fitness costs associated with a low T (b). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Body temperature – Fat reserves – Heterothermia – Hypothermia – Roosting
in
Oecologia
volume
167
pages
21 - 25
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000293914000003
  • scopus:80051672575
ISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/s00442-011-1972-6
project
CAnMove
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fee6dcd1-60d6-49bf-a73e-13e551d7fde0 (old id 1883288)
date added to LUP
2011-04-11 13:04:45
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:16:55
@article{fee6dcd1-60d6-49bf-a73e-13e551d7fde0,
  abstract     = {Birds commonly use rest-phase hypothermia, a controlled reduction of body temperature (T (b)), to conserve energy during times of high metabolic demands. We assessed the flexibility of this heterothermic strategy by increasing roost-site temperature and recording the subsequent T (b) changes in wintering blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus L.), assuming that blue tits would respond to treatment by increasing T (b). We found that birds increased T (b) when roost-site temperature was increased, but only at low ambient temperatures. Moreover, birds with larger fat reserves regulated T (b) at higher levels than birds carrying less fat. This result implies that a roosting blue tit maintains its T (b) at the highest affordable level, as determined by the interacting effect of ecophysiological costs associated with rest-phase hypothermia and energy reserves, in order to minimize potential fitness costs associated with a low T (b).},
  author       = {Nord, Andreas and Nilsson, Johan and Nilsson, Jan-Åke},
  issn         = {1432-1939},
  keyword      = {Body temperature – Fat reserves – Heterothermia – Hypothermia – Roosting},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {21--25},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Oecologia},
  title        = {Nocturnal body temperature in wintering blue tits is affected by roost-site temperature and body reserves.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-1972-6},
  volume       = {167},
  year         = {2011},
}