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Wild-type distributions of seven oral second-line drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Schon, T.; Jureen, P.; Chryssanthou, E.; Giske, C. G.; Sturegård, Erik LU ; Kahlmeter, G.; Hoffner, S. and Angeby, K. A. (2011) In The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 15(4). p.502-509
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as the background data for defining susceptibility breakpoints are limited. METHODS: We determined wild-type MIC distributions of M. tuberculosis using a 96-stick replicator in Middlebrook 7H10 (7H10) medium for ethionamide (ETH), prothionamide, thiacetazone, cycloserine, rifabutin (RFB), clofazimine and linezolid in consecutive susceptible clinical isolates (n = 78). RESULTS: Tentative epidemiological wild-type cut-offs (ECOFF) were determined for all investigated drugs where World Health Organization recommended critical concentrations for 7H10 are lacking, except for ETH. As the ECOFF was closely related to the... (More)
OBJECTIVES: To determine wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as the background data for defining susceptibility breakpoints are limited. METHODS: We determined wild-type MIC distributions of M. tuberculosis using a 96-stick replicator in Middlebrook 7H10 (7H10) medium for ethionamide (ETH), prothionamide, thiacetazone, cycloserine, rifabutin (RFB), clofazimine and linezolid in consecutive susceptible clinical isolates (n = 78). RESULTS: Tentative epidemiological wild-type cut-offs (ECOFF) were determined for all investigated drugs where World Health Organization recommended critical concentrations for 7H10 are lacking, except for ETH. As the ECOFF was closely related to the non-wild-type strains for ETH and thiacetazone, the use of an intermediary (1) category in drug susceptibility testing could increase reproducibility. The cross-resistance between ETH and isoniazid was 21%. Applying 0.5 mg/l as a breakpoint for RFB classified two non-wild type and rpoB mutated isolates as susceptible for RFB and resistant against rifampicin. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that wild-type MIC distributions should be used as a tool to define clinical breakpoints against second-line drugs. This is increasingly important considering the rapid emergence of drug resistance. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
MIC susceptibility testing, pharmacokinetics, linezolid, ethionamide, second-line drugs
in
The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
volume
15
issue
4
pages
502 - 509
publisher
International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
external identifiers
  • wos:000288882300015
  • scopus:79952780073
ISSN
1815-7920
DOI
10.5588/ijtld.10.0238
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b666670a-e885-4b0e-9007-f555c0a6892b (old id 1925328)
date added to LUP
2011-05-02 09:51:40
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:07:25
@article{b666670a-e885-4b0e-9007-f555c0a6892b,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: To determine wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as the background data for defining susceptibility breakpoints are limited. METHODS: We determined wild-type MIC distributions of M. tuberculosis using a 96-stick replicator in Middlebrook 7H10 (7H10) medium for ethionamide (ETH), prothionamide, thiacetazone, cycloserine, rifabutin (RFB), clofazimine and linezolid in consecutive susceptible clinical isolates (n = 78). RESULTS: Tentative epidemiological wild-type cut-offs (ECOFF) were determined for all investigated drugs where World Health Organization recommended critical concentrations for 7H10 are lacking, except for ETH. As the ECOFF was closely related to the non-wild-type strains for ETH and thiacetazone, the use of an intermediary (1) category in drug susceptibility testing could increase reproducibility. The cross-resistance between ETH and isoniazid was 21%. Applying 0.5 mg/l as a breakpoint for RFB classified two non-wild type and rpoB mutated isolates as susceptible for RFB and resistant against rifampicin. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that wild-type MIC distributions should be used as a tool to define clinical breakpoints against second-line drugs. This is increasingly important considering the rapid emergence of drug resistance.},
  author       = {Schon, T. and Jureen, P. and Chryssanthou, E. and Giske, C. G. and Sturegård, Erik and Kahlmeter, G. and Hoffner, S. and Angeby, K. A.},
  issn         = {1815-7920},
  keyword      = {MIC susceptibility testing,pharmacokinetics,linezolid,ethionamide,second-line drugs},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {502--509},
  publisher    = {International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease},
  series       = {The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease},
  title        = {Wild-type distributions of seven oral second-line drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.10.0238},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2011},
}