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Detecting the impact of invasive species on native fauna: Cane toads (Bufo marinus), frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) and the importance of spatial replication

Ujvari, Beata ; Shine, Richard and Madsen, Thomas LU (2011) In Austral Ecology 36(2). p.126-130
Abstract
An understanding of which native species are severely impacted by an anthropogenic change (such as the arrival of an invasive species) and which are not is critical to prioritizing conservation efforts. However, it is difficult to detect such impacts if the native taxa exhibit strong stochastic variations in abundance; a 'natural' population decline might be wrongly interpreted as an impact of the invader. Frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) are large iconic Australian agamids, and have been reported to decline following the invasion of toxic cane toads. We monitored three populations of the species in the savanna woodland of tropical Australia over a 7-year period bracketing toad arrival. One population crashed, one remained stable... (More)
An understanding of which native species are severely impacted by an anthropogenic change (such as the arrival of an invasive species) and which are not is critical to prioritizing conservation efforts. However, it is difficult to detect such impacts if the native taxa exhibit strong stochastic variations in abundance; a 'natural' population decline might be wrongly interpreted as an impact of the invader. Frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) are large iconic Australian agamids, and have been reported to decline following the invasion of toxic cane toads. We monitored three populations of the species in the savanna woodland of tropical Australia over a 7-year period bracketing toad arrival. One population crashed, one remained stable and one increased. Hence, studies on any single population might have inferred that cane toads have negative, negligible or positive effects on frillneck lizards. With the benefit of spatial replication, and in combination with observations of prey choice by captive lizards, our data suggest that invasive cane toads have had little or no effect on frillneck abundance. (Less)
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author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cane toad, ecological impact, frillneck lizard, invasive species, replication
in
Austral Ecology
volume
36
issue
2
pages
126 - 130
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000288867500002
  • scopus:77958018922
ISSN
1442-9985
DOI
10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02126.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Animal Ecology (Closed 2011) (011012001)
id
43cf62bd-6eee-46e4-8e0c-815d17d5362f (old id 1926172)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 14:11:25
date last changed
2021-05-05 01:55:00
@article{43cf62bd-6eee-46e4-8e0c-815d17d5362f,
  abstract     = {An understanding of which native species are severely impacted by an anthropogenic change (such as the arrival of an invasive species) and which are not is critical to prioritizing conservation efforts. However, it is difficult to detect such impacts if the native taxa exhibit strong stochastic variations in abundance; a 'natural' population decline might be wrongly interpreted as an impact of the invader. Frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) are large iconic Australian agamids, and have been reported to decline following the invasion of toxic cane toads. We monitored three populations of the species in the savanna woodland of tropical Australia over a 7-year period bracketing toad arrival. One population crashed, one remained stable and one increased. Hence, studies on any single population might have inferred that cane toads have negative, negligible or positive effects on frillneck lizards. With the benefit of spatial replication, and in combination with observations of prey choice by captive lizards, our data suggest that invasive cane toads have had little or no effect on frillneck abundance.},
  author       = {Ujvari, Beata and Shine, Richard and Madsen, Thomas},
  issn         = {1442-9985},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {126--130},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Austral Ecology},
  title        = {Detecting the impact of invasive species on native fauna: Cane toads (Bufo marinus), frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) and the importance of spatial replication},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02126.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02126.x},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2011},
}