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Dog bite injuries to the hand.

Nygaard Wulff, Marianne LU and Dahlin, Lars LU (2011) In Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery 45(2). p.96-101
Abstract
Abstract Dog bites to the hand and forearm are common. Although bites are usually minor, aggressive dogs may cause extensive bites developing to a public health problem. In a database review of dog bites to the hand applied to Emergency Department or to the Department of Hand Surgery in Malmö, Sweden 2008-2009, we found 81 cases [42 men and 39 women; median age 45 (range 2-88) years]. Three of 81 (4%) were children younger than 11 years. Six of the 81 (8%) patients included had bilateral injuries. Seventy-five patients were treated at the Department of Hand Surgery, where 31 of 75 (41%) were admitted to hospital in 181 days (median 4, range 1-20). The injuries included lacerations of the skin, muscle, and tendons as well as fractures,... (More)
Abstract Dog bites to the hand and forearm are common. Although bites are usually minor, aggressive dogs may cause extensive bites developing to a public health problem. In a database review of dog bites to the hand applied to Emergency Department or to the Department of Hand Surgery in Malmö, Sweden 2008-2009, we found 81 cases [42 men and 39 women; median age 45 (range 2-88) years]. Three of 81 (4%) were children younger than 11 years. Six of the 81 (8%) patients included had bilateral injuries. Seventy-five patients were treated at the Department of Hand Surgery, where 31 of 75 (41%) were admitted to hospital in 181 days (median 4, range 1-20). The injuries included lacerations of the skin, muscle, and tendons as well as fractures, arterial and nerve injuries, and traumatic amputations of fingers. Some cases developed infections, necrosis of muscle and skin, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and even sepsis. A total of 96 operations were done for 51 patients (median 1, range 1-8) and the patients had 343 (median 2, range 0-22) outpatient visits. Almost half of the bites occurred when the patients was trying to separate two fighting dogs. The size of the lacerations increased with the size of the dog. Serious infections were found independently of size of dog. We suggest that education of owners and the public, reporting of all bites, and control of animals are some of the actions to reduce the number of attacks. At least one serious case could have been prevented if the dog had been put down after a previous serious attack. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery
volume
45
issue
2
pages
96 - 101
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000289683300007
  • pmid:21504280
  • scopus:79955436706
ISSN
2000-656X
DOI
10.3109/2000656X.2011.558735
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
72fbe013-93ac-4b38-b20c-2798c30fe1d2 (old id 1936923)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21504280?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-05-02 15:12:10
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:11:41
@article{72fbe013-93ac-4b38-b20c-2798c30fe1d2,
  abstract     = {Abstract Dog bites to the hand and forearm are common. Although bites are usually minor, aggressive dogs may cause extensive bites developing to a public health problem. In a database review of dog bites to the hand applied to Emergency Department or to the Department of Hand Surgery in Malmö, Sweden 2008-2009, we found 81 cases [42 men and 39 women; median age 45 (range 2-88) years]. Three of 81 (4%) were children younger than 11 years. Six of the 81 (8%) patients included had bilateral injuries. Seventy-five patients were treated at the Department of Hand Surgery, where 31 of 75 (41%) were admitted to hospital in 181 days (median 4, range 1-20). The injuries included lacerations of the skin, muscle, and tendons as well as fractures, arterial and nerve injuries, and traumatic amputations of fingers. Some cases developed infections, necrosis of muscle and skin, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and even sepsis. A total of 96 operations were done for 51 patients (median 1, range 1-8) and the patients had 343 (median 2, range 0-22) outpatient visits. Almost half of the bites occurred when the patients was trying to separate two fighting dogs. The size of the lacerations increased with the size of the dog. Serious infections were found independently of size of dog. We suggest that education of owners and the public, reporting of all bites, and control of animals are some of the actions to reduce the number of attacks. At least one serious case could have been prevented if the dog had been put down after a previous serious attack.},
  author       = {Nygaard Wulff, Marianne and Dahlin, Lars},
  issn         = {2000-656X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {96--101},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery},
  title        = {Dog bite injuries to the hand.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/2000656X.2011.558735},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2011},
}