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Efter stormen. En sociologisk undersökning av skogsägarfamiljer

Sellerberg, Ann Mari LU (2011)
Abstract
After the storm. A sociological analysis of families owning forest properties. A Book By Sellerberg publiched by Bokbox, March 2011



"Has it been windy?", someone asks a forest owner in March 2005. In January practically all of his forest was annihilated. A storm rolled by with winds as strong as 46 metres per second. The forest owners in Kronoberg county were particularly badly hit by the disaster. According to to an aerial survey conducted by Skogsvårdsorganisationen 69,7 million cubic metres of forest were damaged by the storm. - Twenty forest owning families in Kronoberg county have been interviewed. These interviews were conducted between June and October 2006.



First comes a description of how the... (More)
After the storm. A sociological analysis of families owning forest properties. A Book By Sellerberg publiched by Bokbox, March 2011



"Has it been windy?", someone asks a forest owner in March 2005. In January practically all of his forest was annihilated. A storm rolled by with winds as strong as 46 metres per second. The forest owners in Kronoberg county were particularly badly hit by the disaster. According to to an aerial survey conducted by Skogsvårdsorganisationen 69,7 million cubic metres of forest were damaged by the storm. - Twenty forest owning families in Kronoberg county have been interviewed. These interviews were conducted between June and October 2006.



First comes a description of how the storm disrupts ordinary life. The chapter "As ordinary life falls apart" highlights three themes. The first theme reflects different phases. At first interviewees experience a phase of unreality followed by a construction oriented rebuilding phase. A second theme focus on how forest owners discern new social groups among people after the storm: the resourceful ones, the ones worthy of compassion and those to be protected from information. A group that was especially talked about were the ones who did not suffer from the storm and who did not grasp the gravity of the situation. This last category became important as a counter image, clarifying the boundaries surrounding their own way of life. Forest owners express themselves in a similar way when looking at forest in the past and in the future. A third theme thus becomes how the crisis makes clear the identity as a forest owner.



Ordinary life with its taken for granted daily routines have fallen apart. The reconstruction of daily reality is, however, not a simple goal oriented process; new routines develop in order to manage an ever changing situation. In this process the families struck be the storm make use of a great number of comparisons. To compare turns into a way of structuring a daily life that has to be rebuilt. Comparisons also inspire actions and feelings and create a foundation from which you can assess a new reality. Comparisons generate work and very concrete aspirations. They also give birth to admiration, compassion and news ideas. Forest owners make comparisons between strong and weak, winners and losers, go-getters and apathetic ones, those who understand the consequences of the storm and those who don't, capitalists and true forest owners, those who got konwledgeable forest workers and those who got ignorant ones, the silent ones and the ones who grab what they can get. These and numerous other comparisons are discussed in the chapter "Daily life is structured through the process of comparisons".



The storm was not only about your own forest, your own daily life or about efforts to normalise your life afterwards. The relationships to other people also changed. The forest owners described how new relationships were established while at the same time already existing social bonds came under reconsideration. The time after the storm became a catalyst. Social relations changed in very real and concrete ways both ways of thought and sets of values. (See the chapter "Relationships".)



After the storm relationships were put to the test. Partly through the creation of new roles: representative, economic negatotiator, guide or through the fact that your own farm became a social a logistc hub. The storm could result in families, friends or acquaintances choosing different paths. At the end the different relationships to surrounding institutions are described. This focuses on institutitions such as the political system, media, the elected local council, the state and important economic institutions. The interviewees see how these have acted in the storm and judge them accordingly. Apart from the concrete changes the different relationships go through the forest owning families throw new light on making moral choices. These families have to assess and judge their relationships in completely new situations. This process of evaluation discussion is analysed in the chapter "Relationships". (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
subject
keywords
family, sociologi, sociology, forest, storm, social relations
pages
172 pages
publisher
Bokbox förlag
ISBN
978-91-86980-56-6
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
a87ad211-2fbf-4f21-98f4-262a83d48573 (old id 1967828)
date added to LUP
2011-05-24 08:03:03
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:16:47
@book{a87ad211-2fbf-4f21-98f4-262a83d48573,
  abstract     = {After the storm. A sociological analysis of families owning forest properties. A Book By Sellerberg publiched by Bokbox, March 2011<br/><br>
<br/><br>
"Has it been windy?", someone asks a forest owner in March 2005. In January practically all of his forest was annihilated. A storm rolled by with winds as strong as 46 metres per second. The forest owners in Kronoberg county were particularly badly hit by the disaster. According to to an aerial survey conducted by Skogsvårdsorganisationen 69,7 million cubic metres of forest were damaged by the storm. - Twenty forest owning families in Kronoberg county have been interviewed. These interviews were conducted between June and October 2006. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
First comes a description of how the storm disrupts ordinary life. The chapter "As ordinary life falls apart" highlights three themes. The first theme reflects different phases. At first interviewees experience a phase of unreality followed by a construction oriented rebuilding phase. A second theme focus on how forest owners discern new social groups among people after the storm: the resourceful ones, the ones worthy of compassion and those to be protected from information. A group that was especially talked about were the ones who did not suffer from the storm and who did not grasp the gravity of the situation. This last category became important as a counter image, clarifying the boundaries surrounding their own way of life. Forest owners express themselves in a similar way when looking at forest in the past and in the future. A third theme thus becomes how the crisis makes clear the identity as a forest owner. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Ordinary life with its taken for granted daily routines have fallen apart. The reconstruction of daily reality is, however, not a simple goal oriented process; new routines develop in order to manage an ever changing situation. In this process the families struck be the storm make use of a great number of comparisons. To compare turns into a way of structuring a daily life that has to be rebuilt. Comparisons also inspire actions and feelings and create a foundation from which you can assess a new reality. Comparisons generate work and very concrete aspirations. They also give birth to admiration, compassion and news ideas. Forest owners make comparisons between strong and weak, winners and losers, go-getters and apathetic ones, those who understand the consequences of the storm and those who don't, capitalists and true forest owners, those who got konwledgeable forest workers and those who got ignorant ones, the silent ones and the ones who grab what they can get. These and numerous other comparisons are discussed in the chapter "Daily life is structured through the process of comparisons". <br/><br>
<br/><br>
The storm was not only about your own forest, your own daily life or about efforts to normalise your life afterwards. The relationships to other people also changed. The forest owners described how new relationships were established while at the same time already existing social bonds came under reconsideration. The time after the storm became a catalyst. Social relations changed in very real and concrete ways both ways of thought and sets of values. (See the chapter "Relationships".)<br/><br>
<br/><br>
After the storm relationships were put to the test. Partly through the creation of new roles: representative, economic negatotiator, guide or through the fact that your own farm became a social a logistc hub. The storm could result in families, friends or acquaintances choosing different paths. At the end the different relationships to surrounding institutions are described. This focuses on institutitions such as the political system, media, the elected local council, the state and important economic institutions. The interviewees see how these have acted in the storm and judge them accordingly. Apart from the concrete changes the different relationships go through the forest owning families throw new light on making moral choices. These families have to assess and judge their relationships in completely new situations. This process of evaluation discussion is analysed in the chapter "Relationships".},
  author       = {Sellerberg, Ann Mari},
  isbn         = {978-91-86980-56-6},
  keyword      = {family,sociologi,sociology,forest,storm,social relations},
  language     = {swe},
  pages        = {172},
  publisher    = {Bokbox förlag},
  title        = {Efter stormen. En sociologisk undersökning av skogsägarfamiljer},
  year         = {2011},
}