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Long-term mortality rate in rheumatoid arthritis patients with disease onset in the 1980s.

C Kapetanovic, Meliha LU ; Lindqvist, Elisabet LU ; Geborek, Pierre LU ; Saxne, Tore LU and Eberhardt, Kerstin LU (2011) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 40. p.433-438
Abstract
Objective: To investigate the mortality rate and possible early predictive factors of mortality after 19-23 years in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed prospectively from disease onset. Patients and methods: A community-based cohort of 183 patients (63% female) with RA and disease duration < 2 years was recruited 1985-1989. The patients were followed yearly from diagnosis until death or 31 December 2008. Mean age and mean duration of symptoms (range) at diagnosis were 52 (18-78) years and 11 (0-24) months, respectively. Death certificates were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register and causes of death were coded by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Death rates of RA patients were... (More)
Objective: To investigate the mortality rate and possible early predictive factors of mortality after 19-23 years in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed prospectively from disease onset. Patients and methods: A community-based cohort of 183 patients (63% female) with RA and disease duration < 2 years was recruited 1985-1989. The patients were followed yearly from diagnosis until death or 31 December 2008. Mean age and mean duration of symptoms (range) at diagnosis were 52 (18-78) years and 11 (0-24) months, respectively. Death certificates were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register and causes of death were coded by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Death rates of RA patients were compared to those of age- and sex-matched controls. Possible predictors of mortality were analysed using a Cox regression model. Results: By 31 December 2008, 69 patients (37 women and 32 men) had died. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.55] and p < 0.09. Older age, male sex, smoking, and the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) at RA diagnosis were identified as early predictors of mortality. CVD was the most common cause of death (46%), followed by malignancies (29%) and infections (13%). RA was not stated as the direct cause of death in any patient and was mentioned among underlying causes in only 16/69 (23%) patients. Conclusion: Mortality rate after 19-23 years of disease duration in this cohort of patients with disease onset in the 1980s was not significantly increased compared to age- and sex-matched controls. No RA disease-related factor predicted mortality. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
40
pages
433 - 438
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000297852500004
  • pmid:21619489
  • scopus:83455259449
ISSN
1502-7732
DOI
10.3109/03009742.2011.573503
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2abe37c7-fd2d-4817-bdd7-9e5bb526d992 (old id 1972011)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21619489?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-06-07 23:16:08
date last changed
2017-04-09 03:04:05
@article{2abe37c7-fd2d-4817-bdd7-9e5bb526d992,
  abstract     = {Objective: To investigate the mortality rate and possible early predictive factors of mortality after 19-23 years in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed prospectively from disease onset. Patients and methods: A community-based cohort of 183 patients (63% female) with RA and disease duration &lt; 2 years was recruited 1985-1989. The patients were followed yearly from diagnosis until death or 31 December 2008. Mean age and mean duration of symptoms (range) at diagnosis were 52 (18-78) years and 11 (0-24) months, respectively. Death certificates were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register and causes of death were coded by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Death rates of RA patients were compared to those of age- and sex-matched controls. Possible predictors of mortality were analysed using a Cox regression model. Results: By 31 December 2008, 69 patients (37 women and 32 men) had died. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.55] and p &lt; 0.09. Older age, male sex, smoking, and the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) at RA diagnosis were identified as early predictors of mortality. CVD was the most common cause of death (46%), followed by malignancies (29%) and infections (13%). RA was not stated as the direct cause of death in any patient and was mentioned among underlying causes in only 16/69 (23%) patients. Conclusion: Mortality rate after 19-23 years of disease duration in this cohort of patients with disease onset in the 1980s was not significantly increased compared to age- and sex-matched controls. No RA disease-related factor predicted mortality.},
  author       = {C Kapetanovic, Meliha and Lindqvist, Elisabet and Geborek, Pierre and Saxne, Tore and Eberhardt, Kerstin},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {433--438},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Long-term mortality rate in rheumatoid arthritis patients with disease onset in the 1980s.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03009742.2011.573503},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2011},
}