Advanced

Recurrent groin hernia surgery.

Sevonius, Dan LU ; Gunnarsson, U; Nordin, P; Nilsson, E and Sandblom, Gabriel LU (2011) In British Journal of Surgery 98. p.1489-1494
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reoperation rate after recurrent groin hernia surgery is more than twice that recorded for primary groin hernia procedures. The aim was to define the outcome from routine redo hernia surgery by analysing a large population-based cohort from a national hernia register. METHODS: All recurrent groin hernia operations registered in the Swedish Hernia Register from 1992 to 2008 were analysed using multivariable analysis with stratification for preceding repair. RESULTS: Altogether 174 527 hernia operations were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and 2008, including 19 582 reoperations. The preceding repair was included in the register for 5565 of these recurrent repairs. With laparoscopic repair as reference... (More)
BACKGROUND: The reoperation rate after recurrent groin hernia surgery is more than twice that recorded for primary groin hernia procedures. The aim was to define the outcome from routine redo hernia surgery by analysing a large population-based cohort from a national hernia register. METHODS: All recurrent groin hernia operations registered in the Swedish Hernia Register from 1992 to 2008 were analysed using multivariable analysis with stratification for preceding repair. RESULTS: Altogether 174 527 hernia operations were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and 2008, including 19 582 reoperations. The preceding repair was included in the register for 5565 of these recurrent repairs. With laparoscopic repair as reference standard, the hazard ratio for recurrence was 2·55 (95 per cent confidence interval 1·66 to 3·93) after sutured repair, 1·53 (1·20 to 1·95) after Lichtenstein repair, 2·31 (1·76 to 3·03) after plug repair, 1·36 (0·95 to 1·94) after open preperitoneal mesh and 3·08 (2·22 to 4·29) after other repairs. Laparoscopic and open preperitoneal repair were associated with a lower risk of reoperation following a preceding open repair (P < 0·001), but no technique differed significantly from the others following a preceding preperitoneal repair. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic and the open preperitoneal mesh methods of repair for recurrent groin hernias were associated with the lowest risk of reoperation. Although the method of repair in previous surgery must be considered, these techniques are the preferred methods for recurrent groin hernia surgery. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Surgery
volume
98
pages
1489 - 1494
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000295320300025
  • pmid:21618495
  • scopus:80052422919
ISSN
1365-2168
DOI
10.1002/bjs.7559
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3fb2ef9b-728d-4835-ac4d-fceb732352a7 (old id 1972019)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21618495?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-06-07 23:20:12
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:54:49
@article{3fb2ef9b-728d-4835-ac4d-fceb732352a7,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The reoperation rate after recurrent groin hernia surgery is more than twice that recorded for primary groin hernia procedures. The aim was to define the outcome from routine redo hernia surgery by analysing a large population-based cohort from a national hernia register. METHODS: All recurrent groin hernia operations registered in the Swedish Hernia Register from 1992 to 2008 were analysed using multivariable analysis with stratification for preceding repair. RESULTS: Altogether 174 527 hernia operations were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and 2008, including 19 582 reoperations. The preceding repair was included in the register for 5565 of these recurrent repairs. With laparoscopic repair as reference standard, the hazard ratio for recurrence was 2·55 (95 per cent confidence interval 1·66 to 3·93) after sutured repair, 1·53 (1·20 to 1·95) after Lichtenstein repair, 2·31 (1·76 to 3·03) after plug repair, 1·36 (0·95 to 1·94) after open preperitoneal mesh and 3·08 (2·22 to 4·29) after other repairs. Laparoscopic and open preperitoneal repair were associated with a lower risk of reoperation following a preceding open repair (P &lt; 0·001), but no technique differed significantly from the others following a preceding preperitoneal repair. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic and the open preperitoneal mesh methods of repair for recurrent groin hernias were associated with the lowest risk of reoperation. Although the method of repair in previous surgery must be considered, these techniques are the preferred methods for recurrent groin hernia surgery. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Sevonius, Dan and Gunnarsson, U and Nordin, P and Nilsson, E and Sandblom, Gabriel},
  issn         = {1365-2168},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1489--1494},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {British Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Recurrent groin hernia surgery.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.7559},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2011},
}