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Bacterial pH-optima for growth track soil pH, but are higher than expected at low pH

Fernandez-Lopez, David LU ; Rousk, Johannes LU ; Brookes, Philip C. and Bååth, Erland LU (2011) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43(7). p.1569-1575
Abstract
One of the most influential factors determining the growth and composition of soil bacterial communities is pH. However, soil pH is often correlated with many other factors, including nutrient availability and plant community, and causality among factors is not easily determined. If soil pH is directly influencing the bacterial community, this must lead to a bacterial community growth optimised for the in situ pH. Using one set of Iberian soils (46 soils covering pH 4.2-7.3) and one set of UK grassland soils (16 soils covering pH 3.3-7.5) we measured the pH-optima for the growth of bacterial communities. Bacterial growth was estimated by the leucine incorporation method. The pH-optima for bacterial growth were positively correlated with... (More)
One of the most influential factors determining the growth and composition of soil bacterial communities is pH. However, soil pH is often correlated with many other factors, including nutrient availability and plant community, and causality among factors is not easily determined. If soil pH is directly influencing the bacterial community, this must lead to a bacterial community growth optimised for the in situ pH. Using one set of Iberian soils (46 soils covering pH 4.2-7.3) and one set of UK grassland soils (16 soils covering pH 3.3-7.5) we measured the pH-optima for the growth of bacterial communities. Bacterial growth was estimated by the leucine incorporation method. The pH-optima for bacterial growth were positively correlated with soil pH, demonstrating its direct influence on the soil bacterial community. We found that the pH from a water extraction better matched the bacterial growth optimum compared with salt extractions of soil. Furthermore, we also showed a more subtle pattern between bacterial pH growth optima and soil pH. While closely matched at neutral pHs, pH-optima became higher than the in situ pH in more acid soils, resulting in a difference of about one pH-unit at the low-pH end. We propose that an explanation for the pattern is an interaction between increasing overall bacterial growth with higher pHs and the unimodal pH-response for growth of bacterial communities. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Soil acidity, pH-tolerance, Bacterial growth, pH-optima, Leucine, incorporation
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
43
issue
7
pages
1569 - 1575
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000291576800022
  • scopus:79955979968
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.04.007
project
Effect of environmental factors on fungal and bacterial growth in soil
Interaction between fungi and bacteria in soil
Microbial carbon-use efficiency
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d0bcf702-650a-44d9-adf0-9396a5ae0a64 (old id 1984703)
date added to LUP
2011-07-08 15:45:07
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:12:04
@article{d0bcf702-650a-44d9-adf0-9396a5ae0a64,
  abstract     = {One of the most influential factors determining the growth and composition of soil bacterial communities is pH. However, soil pH is often correlated with many other factors, including nutrient availability and plant community, and causality among factors is not easily determined. If soil pH is directly influencing the bacterial community, this must lead to a bacterial community growth optimised for the in situ pH. Using one set of Iberian soils (46 soils covering pH 4.2-7.3) and one set of UK grassland soils (16 soils covering pH 3.3-7.5) we measured the pH-optima for the growth of bacterial communities. Bacterial growth was estimated by the leucine incorporation method. The pH-optima for bacterial growth were positively correlated with soil pH, demonstrating its direct influence on the soil bacterial community. We found that the pH from a water extraction better matched the bacterial growth optimum compared with salt extractions of soil. Furthermore, we also showed a more subtle pattern between bacterial pH growth optima and soil pH. While closely matched at neutral pHs, pH-optima became higher than the in situ pH in more acid soils, resulting in a difference of about one pH-unit at the low-pH end. We propose that an explanation for the pattern is an interaction between increasing overall bacterial growth with higher pHs and the unimodal pH-response for growth of bacterial communities. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Fernandez-Lopez, David and Rousk, Johannes and Brookes, Philip C. and Bååth, Erland},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {Soil acidity,pH-tolerance,Bacterial growth,pH-optima,Leucine,incorporation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1569--1575},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {Bacterial pH-optima for growth track soil pH, but are higher than expected at low pH},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.04.007},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2011},
}