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Metabolic syndrome and rare gynecological cancers in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can)

Nagel, G.; Concin, H.; Bjorge, T.; Rapp, K.; Manjer, Jonas LU ; Hallmans, G.; Diem, G.; Haggstrom, C.; Engeland, A. and Almquist, Martin LU , et al. (2011) In Annals of Oncology 22(6). p.1339-1345
Abstract
Background: Risk factors for rare gynecological cancers are largely unknown. Initial research has indicated that the metabolic syndrome (MetS) or individual components could play a role. Materials and methods: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project cohort includes 288 834 women. During an average follow-up of 11 years, 82 vulvar, 26 vaginal and 43 other rare gynecological cancers were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated fitting Cox proportional hazards regression models for tertiles and standardized z-scores [with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation (SD) of 1] of body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurement of metabolic... (More)
Background: Risk factors for rare gynecological cancers are largely unknown. Initial research has indicated that the metabolic syndrome (MetS) or individual components could play a role. Materials and methods: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project cohort includes 288 834 women. During an average follow-up of 11 years, 82 vulvar, 26 vaginal and 43 other rare gynecological cancers were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated fitting Cox proportional hazards regression models for tertiles and standardized z-scores [with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation (SD) of 1] of body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurement of metabolic factors. Results: The MetS was associated with increased risk of vulvar [HR 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.41) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.07-3.25). Among separate MetS components, 1 SD increase in BMI was associated with overall risk (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.23-1.66), vulvar (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.11-1.69) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.30-2.46). Blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations were associated with increased risk of vulvar cancer (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.10-3.58 and HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.39-3.15, respectively). Conclusion: The results from this first prospective study on rare gynecological cancers suggest that the MetS and its individual components may play a role in the development of these tumors. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
epidemiology, MetS, rare gynecological cancers
in
Annals of Oncology
volume
22
issue
6
pages
1339 - 1345
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000291060800014
  • scopus:79957849240
ISSN
1569-8041
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdq597
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0fc2029c-851c-4a3a-90fb-7f3e852ed4b0 (old id 1985641)
date added to LUP
2011-07-01 09:02:55
date last changed
2017-05-21 03:55:51
@article{0fc2029c-851c-4a3a-90fb-7f3e852ed4b0,
  abstract     = {Background: Risk factors for rare gynecological cancers are largely unknown. Initial research has indicated that the metabolic syndrome (MetS) or individual components could play a role. Materials and methods: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project cohort includes 288 834 women. During an average follow-up of 11 years, 82 vulvar, 26 vaginal and 43 other rare gynecological cancers were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated fitting Cox proportional hazards regression models for tertiles and standardized z-scores [with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation (SD) of 1] of body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurement of metabolic factors. Results: The MetS was associated with increased risk of vulvar [HR 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.41) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.07-3.25). Among separate MetS components, 1 SD increase in BMI was associated with overall risk (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.23-1.66), vulvar (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.11-1.69) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.30-2.46). Blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations were associated with increased risk of vulvar cancer (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.10-3.58 and HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.39-3.15, respectively). Conclusion: The results from this first prospective study on rare gynecological cancers suggest that the MetS and its individual components may play a role in the development of these tumors.},
  author       = {Nagel, G. and Concin, H. and Bjorge, T. and Rapp, K. and Manjer, Jonas and Hallmans, G. and Diem, G. and Haggstrom, C. and Engeland, A. and Almquist, Martin and Jonsson, H. and Selmer, R. and Stocks, T. and Tretli, S. and Ulmer, H. and Stattin, P. and Lukanova, A.},
  issn         = {1569-8041},
  keyword      = {epidemiology,MetS,rare gynecological cancers},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1339--1345},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Annals of Oncology},
  title        = {Metabolic syndrome and rare gynecological cancers in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdq597},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2011},
}