Advanced

GLP-1 for type 2 diabetes

Ahrén, Bo LU (2011) In Experimental Cell Research 317(9). p.1239-1245
Abstract
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy of type 2 diabetes is executed either by GLP-1 receptor agonists, which stimulate the GLP-1 receptors, or by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which prevent the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 thereby increasing the concentration of endogenous active GLP-1. GLP-1 activates pancreatic receptors resulting in improved glycemia through glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. There is also a potential beta cell preservation effect, as judged from rodent studies. GLP-1 receptors are additionally expressed in extrapancreatic tissue, having potential for the treatment to reduce body weight and to potentially have beneficial cardio- and... (More)
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy of type 2 diabetes is executed either by GLP-1 receptor agonists, which stimulate the GLP-1 receptors, or by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which prevent the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 thereby increasing the concentration of endogenous active GLP-1. GLP-1 activates pancreatic receptors resulting in improved glycemia through glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. There is also a potential beta cell preservation effect, as judged from rodent studies. GLP-1 receptors are additionally expressed in extrapancreatic tissue, having potential for the treatment to reduce body weight and to potentially have beneficial cardio- and endothelioprotective effects. Clinical trials in subjects with type 2 diabetes have shown that in periods of 12 weeks or more, these treatments reduce HbA1c by approximate to 0.8-1.1% from baseline levels of 7.7-8.5%, and they are efficient both as monotherapy and in combination therapy with metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones or insulin. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor agonists reduce body weight, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors are body weight neutral. The treatment is safe with very low risk for adverse events, including hypoglycaemia. GLP-1 based therapy is thus a novel and now well established therapy of type 2 diabetes, with a particular value in combination with metformin in patients who are inadequately controlled by metformin alone. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
GLP-1, DPP-4 inhibition, Type 2 diabetes, Exenatide, Liraglutide, Albiglutide, Taspoglutide, Lixisenatide, Sitagliptin, Vildagliptin, Saxagliptin, Alogliptin, Linagliptin
in
Experimental Cell Research
volume
317
issue
9
pages
1239 - 1245
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000290839300001
  • scopus:79952291919
ISSN
1090-2422
DOI
10.1016/j.yexcr.2011.01.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aeffe966-bf53-4304-a609-c7870fc50243 (old id 1986379)
date added to LUP
2011-07-01 09:14:17
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:12:55
@article{aeffe966-bf53-4304-a609-c7870fc50243,
  abstract     = {Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy of type 2 diabetes is executed either by GLP-1 receptor agonists, which stimulate the GLP-1 receptors, or by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which prevent the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 thereby increasing the concentration of endogenous active GLP-1. GLP-1 activates pancreatic receptors resulting in improved glycemia through glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. There is also a potential beta cell preservation effect, as judged from rodent studies. GLP-1 receptors are additionally expressed in extrapancreatic tissue, having potential for the treatment to reduce body weight and to potentially have beneficial cardio- and endothelioprotective effects. Clinical trials in subjects with type 2 diabetes have shown that in periods of 12 weeks or more, these treatments reduce HbA1c by approximate to 0.8-1.1% from baseline levels of 7.7-8.5%, and they are efficient both as monotherapy and in combination therapy with metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones or insulin. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor agonists reduce body weight, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors are body weight neutral. The treatment is safe with very low risk for adverse events, including hypoglycaemia. GLP-1 based therapy is thus a novel and now well established therapy of type 2 diabetes, with a particular value in combination with metformin in patients who are inadequately controlled by metformin alone. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Ahrén, Bo},
  issn         = {1090-2422},
  keyword      = {GLP-1,DPP-4 inhibition,Type 2 diabetes,Exenatide,Liraglutide,Albiglutide,Taspoglutide,Lixisenatide,Sitagliptin,Vildagliptin,Saxagliptin,Alogliptin,Linagliptin},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1239--1245},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Experimental Cell Research},
  title        = {GLP-1 for type 2 diabetes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexcr.2011.01.010},
  volume       = {317},
  year         = {2011},
}