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Metabolic Factors and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in 580,000 Men and Women in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project (Me-Can)

Stocks, Tanja; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Bjorge, Tone; Ulmer, Hanno; Manjer, Jonas LU ; Almquist, Martin LU ; Concin, Hans; Engeland, Anders; Hallmans, Goran and Nagel, Gabriele, et al. (2011) In Cancer 117(11). p.2398-2407
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but the modest size of previous studies precluded detailed characterization of the role of individual MetS factors and their interaction on risk. METHODS: In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project (Me-Can), data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for 578,700 men and women. The mean age of participants at baseline was 44 years, and the mean follow-up was 12 years. Relative risks (RR) of colorectal cancer per 1 standard deviation increment in Z score of factors and for a combined MetS score, were calculated from Cox regression models, including adjustment... (More)
BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but the modest size of previous studies precluded detailed characterization of the role of individual MetS factors and their interaction on risk. METHODS: In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project (Me-Can), data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for 578,700 men and women. The mean age of participants at baseline was 44 years, and the mean follow-up was 12 years. Relative risks (RR) of colorectal cancer per 1 standard deviation increment in Z score of factors and for a combined MetS score, were calculated from Cox regression models, including adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: During follow-up, 2834 men and 1861 women were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The RR of colorectal cancer for the MetS score was 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-1.32) in men, and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.06-1.22) in women. Significant associations also were observed in men for BMI (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.13), blood pressure (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02-1.18), and triglycerides (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.06-1.28) and, in women, for BMI (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.15). There was no significant positive interaction between the metabolic factors on risk. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of metabolic factors and some separate factors was related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but there was no interaction between metabolic factors. Cancer 2011; 117: 2398-407. (C) 2010 American Cancer Society. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
epidemiology, cohort studies, colorectal neoplasms, overweight, blood, pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, metabolic syndrome, X
in
Cancer
volume
117
issue
11
pages
2398 - 2407
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000290859900011
  • scopus:79958732887
ISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/cncr.25772
language
English
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yes
id
5da23781-89d9-43bc-9964-6eed03cdf1a2 (old id 1986491)
date added to LUP
2011-07-01 09:09:31
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:04:43
@article{5da23781-89d9-43bc-9964-6eed03cdf1a2,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but the modest size of previous studies precluded detailed characterization of the role of individual MetS factors and their interaction on risk. METHODS: In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project (Me-Can), data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for 578,700 men and women. The mean age of participants at baseline was 44 years, and the mean follow-up was 12 years. Relative risks (RR) of colorectal cancer per 1 standard deviation increment in Z score of factors and for a combined MetS score, were calculated from Cox regression models, including adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: During follow-up, 2834 men and 1861 women were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The RR of colorectal cancer for the MetS score was 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-1.32) in men, and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.06-1.22) in women. Significant associations also were observed in men for BMI (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.13), blood pressure (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02-1.18), and triglycerides (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.06-1.28) and, in women, for BMI (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.15). There was no significant positive interaction between the metabolic factors on risk. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of metabolic factors and some separate factors was related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but there was no interaction between metabolic factors. Cancer 2011; 117: 2398-407. (C) 2010 American Cancer Society.},
  author       = {Stocks, Tanja and Lukanova, Annekatrin and Bjorge, Tone and Ulmer, Hanno and Manjer, Jonas and Almquist, Martin and Concin, Hans and Engeland, Anders and Hallmans, Goran and Nagel, Gabriele and Tretli, Steinar and Veierod, Marit B. and Jonsson, Hakan and Stattin, Par},
  issn         = {1097-0142},
  keyword      = {epidemiology,cohort studies,colorectal neoplasms,overweight,blood,pressure,blood glucose,cholesterol,triglycerides,metabolic syndrome,X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2398--2407},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Cancer},
  title        = {Metabolic Factors and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in 580,000 Men and Women in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project (Me-Can)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.25772},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2011},
}