Advanced

Impact of Atomic Oxygen on the Structure of Graphene Formed on Ir(111) and Pt(111)

Vinogradov, Nikolay LU ; Schulte, Karina LU ; Ng, May Ling LU ; Mikkelsen, Anders LU ; Lundgren, Edvin LU ; Mårtensson, Nils LU and Preobrajenski, Alexei LU (2011) In Journal of Physical Chemistry C 115(19). p.9568-9577
Abstract
The effect of atomic oxygen adsorption on the structure and electronic properties of monolayer graphite (MG or graphene) grown on Pt(111) and Ir(111) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. For comparison, the adsorption of atomic oxygen on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite has been studied under the same conditions. Graphene oxidation predominantly occurs through the formation of epoxy groups and causes atomic-scale buckling of the graphene lattice, as evidenced by an sp(2)-to-sp(3) bonding transformation. The different parts of the graphene/metal moire superstructure show different oxidation dynamics, with the initial formation of... (More)
The effect of atomic oxygen adsorption on the structure and electronic properties of monolayer graphite (MG or graphene) grown on Pt(111) and Ir(111) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. For comparison, the adsorption of atomic oxygen on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite has been studied under the same conditions. Graphene oxidation predominantly occurs through the formation of epoxy groups and causes atomic-scale buckling of the graphene lattice, as evidenced by an sp(2)-to-sp(3) bonding transformation. The different parts of the graphene/metal moire superstructure show different oxidation dynamics, with the initial formation of epoxy groups in the more bonding "pores". Upon 0 adsorption, the nearest C neighbors of epoxy groups get engaged in a stronger bonding with the substrate. As a result, the pores of the graphene mesh become attracted and effectively pinned to the substrate by the 0 atoms. A limited intercalation of oxygen under graphene is also probable. Annealing of the samples after oxygen exposure only partially recovers the original graphene structure and results in the formation of a dense pattern of quasi-periodic, nanometer-sized holes. Both the selective oxidization and the hole formation can be exploited for selective functionalization or tuning of the electronic properties. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
volume
115
issue
19
pages
9568 - 9577
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000290427400033
  • scopus:79956081729
ISSN
1932-7447
DOI
10.1021/jp111962k
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
abdf3a19-0b45-4380-8aaf-d22ff1b713ce (old id 1986833)
date added to LUP
2011-06-29 10:08:07
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:21:46
@article{abdf3a19-0b45-4380-8aaf-d22ff1b713ce,
  abstract     = {The effect of atomic oxygen adsorption on the structure and electronic properties of monolayer graphite (MG or graphene) grown on Pt(111) and Ir(111) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. For comparison, the adsorption of atomic oxygen on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite has been studied under the same conditions. Graphene oxidation predominantly occurs through the formation of epoxy groups and causes atomic-scale buckling of the graphene lattice, as evidenced by an sp(2)-to-sp(3) bonding transformation. The different parts of the graphene/metal moire superstructure show different oxidation dynamics, with the initial formation of epoxy groups in the more bonding "pores". Upon 0 adsorption, the nearest C neighbors of epoxy groups get engaged in a stronger bonding with the substrate. As a result, the pores of the graphene mesh become attracted and effectively pinned to the substrate by the 0 atoms. A limited intercalation of oxygen under graphene is also probable. Annealing of the samples after oxygen exposure only partially recovers the original graphene structure and results in the formation of a dense pattern of quasi-periodic, nanometer-sized holes. Both the selective oxidization and the hole formation can be exploited for selective functionalization or tuning of the electronic properties.},
  author       = {Vinogradov, Nikolay and Schulte, Karina and Ng, May Ling and Mikkelsen, Anders and Lundgren, Edvin and Mårtensson, Nils and Preobrajenski, Alexei},
  issn         = {1932-7447},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {19},
  pages        = {9568--9577},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of Physical Chemistry C},
  title        = {Impact of Atomic Oxygen on the Structure of Graphene Formed on Ir(111) and Pt(111)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp111962k},
  volume       = {115},
  year         = {2011},
}