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Risk of Diabetes Among Young Adults Born Preterm in Sweden

Crump, Casey; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2011) In Diabetes Care 34(5). p.1109-1113
Abstract
OBJECTIVE-Previous studies have suggested that preterm birth is associated with diabetes later in life. These studies have shown inconsistent results for late preterm births and have had various limitations, including the inability to evaluate diabetic outpatients or to estimate risk across the full range of gestational ages. Our objective was to determine whether preterm birth is associated with diabetes medication prescription in a national cohort of young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-This was a national cohort study of 630,090 infants born in Sweden from 1973 through 1979 (including 27,953 born preterm, gestational age < 37 weeks), followed for diabetes medication prescription in 2005-2009 (ages 25.5-37.0 years). Medication... (More)
OBJECTIVE-Previous studies have suggested that preterm birth is associated with diabetes later in life. These studies have shown inconsistent results for late preterm births and have had various limitations, including the inability to evaluate diabetic outpatients or to estimate risk across the full range of gestational ages. Our objective was to determine whether preterm birth is associated with diabetes medication prescription in a national cohort of young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-This was a national cohort study of 630,090 infants born in Sweden from 1973 through 1979 (including 27,953 born preterm, gestational age < 37 weeks), followed for diabetes medication prescription in 2005-2009 (ages 25.5-37.0 years). Medication data were obtained from all outpatient and inpatient pharmacies throughout Sweden. RESULTS-Individuals born preterm, including those born late preterm (gestational age 35-36 weeks), had modestly increased odds ratios (ORs) for diabetes medication prescription relative to those born full term, after adjusting for fetal growth and other potential confounders. Insulin and/or oral diabetes medications were prescribed to 1.5% of individuals born preterm compared with 1.2% of those born full term (adjusted OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.02-1.26]). Insulin without oral diabetes medications was prescribed to 1.0% of individuals born preterm compared with 0.8% of those born full term (1.22 [1.08-1.39]). CONCLUSIONS-Preterm birth, including late preterm birth, is associated with a modestly increased risk of diabetes in young Swedish adults. These findings have important public health implications given the increasing number of preterm births and the large disease burden of diabetes, particularly when diagnosed in young adulthood. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
34
issue
5
pages
1109 - 1113
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000290419200010
  • scopus:79956072509
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc10-2108
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5aa2510e-c4e4-43d2-8b14-2c23e8b6d624 (old id 1987911)
date added to LUP
2011-07-01 09:16:22
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:34:42
@article{5aa2510e-c4e4-43d2-8b14-2c23e8b6d624,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE-Previous studies have suggested that preterm birth is associated with diabetes later in life. These studies have shown inconsistent results for late preterm births and have had various limitations, including the inability to evaluate diabetic outpatients or to estimate risk across the full range of gestational ages. Our objective was to determine whether preterm birth is associated with diabetes medication prescription in a national cohort of young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-This was a national cohort study of 630,090 infants born in Sweden from 1973 through 1979 (including 27,953 born preterm, gestational age &lt; 37 weeks), followed for diabetes medication prescription in 2005-2009 (ages 25.5-37.0 years). Medication data were obtained from all outpatient and inpatient pharmacies throughout Sweden. RESULTS-Individuals born preterm, including those born late preterm (gestational age 35-36 weeks), had modestly increased odds ratios (ORs) for diabetes medication prescription relative to those born full term, after adjusting for fetal growth and other potential confounders. Insulin and/or oral diabetes medications were prescribed to 1.5% of individuals born preterm compared with 1.2% of those born full term (adjusted OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.02-1.26]). Insulin without oral diabetes medications was prescribed to 1.0% of individuals born preterm compared with 0.8% of those born full term (1.22 [1.08-1.39]). CONCLUSIONS-Preterm birth, including late preterm birth, is associated with a modestly increased risk of diabetes in young Swedish adults. These findings have important public health implications given the increasing number of preterm births and the large disease burden of diabetes, particularly when diagnosed in young adulthood.},
  author       = {Crump, Casey and Winkleby, Marilyn A. and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1109--1113},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Risk of Diabetes Among Young Adults Born Preterm in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc10-2108},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2011},
}