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Does a childhood fracture predict low bone mass in young adulthood? - A 27-year prospective controlled study.

Buttazzoni, Christian LU ; Rosengren, E LU ; Tveit, Magnus LU ; Landin, Lennart LU ; Nilsson, J-Å LU and Karlsson, K M LU (2013) In Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 28(2). p.351-359
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

A fracture in childhood is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is debated whether a fracture at growth also predicts low BMD in young adulthood. PURPOSE: To gender-specifically evaluate whether children with a fracture are at increased risk of low BMD in young adulthood.



METHODS:

Distal forearm BMD (g/cm(2) ) was measured with single photon absorptiometry (SPA) in 47 boys and 26 girls (mean age 10 years, range 3-16) with an index fracture and in 41 boys and 43 girls (mean age 10 years, range 4-16) with no fracture. BMD was re-measured mean 27 years later with the same SPA apparatus and with dual energy absorptiometry (DXA), quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and peripheral... (More)
BACKGROUND:

A fracture in childhood is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is debated whether a fracture at growth also predicts low BMD in young adulthood. PURPOSE: To gender-specifically evaluate whether children with a fracture are at increased risk of low BMD in young adulthood.



METHODS:

Distal forearm BMD (g/cm(2) ) was measured with single photon absorptiometry (SPA) in 47 boys and 26 girls (mean age 10 years, range 3-16) with an index fracture and in 41 boys and 43 girls (mean age 10 years, range 4-16) with no fracture. BMD was re-measured mean 27 years later with the same SPA apparatus and with dual energy absorptiometry (DXA), quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and peripheral computed tomography (pQCT). Individual Z-scores were calculated using the control cohort as reference population. Data are presented as means with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) within brackets and correlation with Pearson's correlation coefficient



RESULTS:

Boys with an index fracture had at fracture event a distal forearm BMD Z-score of -0.4 (-0.7, -0.1) and at follow-up -0.4 (-0.7, -0.1). Corresponding values in girls were -0.2 (-0.5, 0.1) and -0.3 (-0.7, 0.1). The deficit in absolute bone mass was driven by men with index fractures in childhood due to low rather than moderate or high energy. There were no changes in BMD Z-score during the follow-up period. The BMD deficit at follow-up was in boys with an index fracture verified with all advocated techniques



CONCLUSIONS:

A childhood fracture in men was associated with low BMD and smaller bone size in young adulthood while the deficit in women did not reach statistical significance. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
volume
28
issue
2
pages
351 - 359
publisher
AMBMR
external identifiers
  • wos:000315105600014
  • pmid:22915380
  • scopus:84872447957
  • pmid:22915380
ISSN
1523-4681
DOI
10.1002/jbmr.1743
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1a4d7116-7a15-42d4-96d0-86466e525639 (old id 3047289)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22915380?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:47:14
date last changed
2020-07-08 01:30:06
@article{1a4d7116-7a15-42d4-96d0-86466e525639,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: <br/><br>
A fracture in childhood is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is debated whether a fracture at growth also predicts low BMD in young adulthood. PURPOSE: To gender-specifically evaluate whether children with a fracture are at increased risk of low BMD in young adulthood. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: <br/><br>
Distal forearm BMD (g/cm(2) ) was measured with single photon absorptiometry (SPA) in 47 boys and 26 girls (mean age 10 years, range 3-16) with an index fracture and in 41 boys and 43 girls (mean age 10 years, range 4-16) with no fracture. BMD was re-measured mean 27 years later with the same SPA apparatus and with dual energy absorptiometry (DXA), quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and peripheral computed tomography (pQCT). Individual Z-scores were calculated using the control cohort as reference population. Data are presented as means with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) within brackets and correlation with Pearson's correlation coefficient <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
Boys with an index fracture had at fracture event a distal forearm BMD Z-score of -0.4 (-0.7, -0.1) and at follow-up -0.4 (-0.7, -0.1). Corresponding values in girls were -0.2 (-0.5, 0.1) and -0.3 (-0.7, 0.1). The deficit in absolute bone mass was driven by men with index fractures in childhood due to low rather than moderate or high energy. There were no changes in BMD Z-score during the follow-up period. The BMD deficit at follow-up was in boys with an index fracture verified with all advocated techniques <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
A childhood fracture in men was associated with low BMD and smaller bone size in young adulthood while the deficit in women did not reach statistical significance. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.},
  author       = {Buttazzoni, Christian and Rosengren, E and Tveit, Magnus and Landin, Lennart and Nilsson, J-Å and Karlsson, K M},
  issn         = {1523-4681},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {351--359},
  publisher    = {AMBMR},
  series       = {Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  title        = {Does a childhood fracture predict low bone mass in young adulthood? - A 27-year prospective controlled study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.1743},
  doi          = {10.1002/jbmr.1743},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2013},
}