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Neighborhoods and mortality in Sweden : Is deprivation best assessed nationally or regionally?

Åström, Daniel Oudin LU ; Franks, Paul W. LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2018) In Demographic Research 38(1). p.429-450
Abstract

BACKGROUND The association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality is well established, but knowledge about whether deprivation is best assessed regionally or nationally is scarce. OBJECTIVE The present study aims to examine whether there is a difference in results when using national and county-specific neighborhood deprivation indices and whether the level of urbanization modifies the association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality. METHODS We collected data on the entire population aged above 50 residing in the 21 Swedish counties on January 1, 1990, and followed them for mortality due to all causes and for coronary heart disease. The association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality was assessed using Cox... (More)

BACKGROUND The association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality is well established, but knowledge about whether deprivation is best assessed regionally or nationally is scarce. OBJECTIVE The present study aims to examine whether there is a difference in results when using national and county-specific neighborhood deprivation indices and whether the level of urbanization modifies the association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality. METHODS We collected data on the entire population aged above 50 residing in the 21 Swedish counties on January 1, 1990, and followed them for mortality due to all causes and for coronary heart disease. The association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality was assessed using Cox regression, assuming proportional hazards with attained age as an underlying variable, comparing the 25% most deprived neighborhoods with the 25% most affluent ones within each region, and using both the national and the county-specific indices. The potential interactions were also assessed. RESULTS The choice of a national or a county-specific index did not affect the estimates to a large extent. The effect of neighborhood deprivation on mortality in metropolitan regions (hazard ratio: 1.21 [1.20-1.22]) was somewhat higher than that in the more rural southern (HR: 1.16 [1.15-1.17]) and northern regions (HR: 1.11 [1.09-1.12]). CONCLUSION Our data indicates that the choice of a national or a county-specific deprivation index does not influence the results to a significant extent, but may be of importance in large metropolitan regions. Furthermore, the strength of the association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality is somewhat greater in metropolitan areas than in more rural southern and northern areas.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Demographic Research
volume
38
issue
1
pages
22 pages
publisher
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042015129
ISSN
1435-9871
DOI
10.4054/DemRes.2018.38.18
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1ac0efc5-e157-40c3-acec-13881acd1e84
date added to LUP
2018-03-07 09:46:06
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:18:19
@article{1ac0efc5-e157-40c3-acec-13881acd1e84,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND The association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality is well established, but knowledge about whether deprivation is best assessed regionally or nationally is scarce. OBJECTIVE The present study aims to examine whether there is a difference in results when using national and county-specific neighborhood deprivation indices and whether the level of urbanization modifies the association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality. METHODS We collected data on the entire population aged above 50 residing in the 21 Swedish counties on January 1, 1990, and followed them for mortality due to all causes and for coronary heart disease. The association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality was assessed using Cox regression, assuming proportional hazards with attained age as an underlying variable, comparing the 25% most deprived neighborhoods with the 25% most affluent ones within each region, and using both the national and the county-specific indices. The potential interactions were also assessed. RESULTS The choice of a national or a county-specific index did not affect the estimates to a large extent. The effect of neighborhood deprivation on mortality in metropolitan regions (hazard ratio: 1.21 [1.20-1.22]) was somewhat higher than that in the more rural southern (HR: 1.16 [1.15-1.17]) and northern regions (HR: 1.11 [1.09-1.12]). CONCLUSION Our data indicates that the choice of a national or a county-specific deprivation index does not influence the results to a significant extent, but may be of importance in large metropolitan regions. Furthermore, the strength of the association between neighborhood deprivation and mortality is somewhat greater in metropolitan areas than in more rural southern and northern areas.</p>},
  articleno    = {18},
  author       = {Åström, Daniel Oudin and Franks, Paul W. and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1435-9871},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {429--450},
  publisher    = {Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research},
  series       = {Demographic Research},
  title        = {Neighborhoods and mortality in Sweden : Is deprivation best assessed nationally or regionally?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4054/DemRes.2018.38.18},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2018},
}