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Exploring multidimensionality : Acoustic and articulatory correlates of Swedish word accents

Svensson Lundmark, Malin LU ; Ambrazaitis, Gilbert LU and Ewald, Otto LU (2017) Interspeech 2017 In Interspeech 2017 p.3236-3240
Abstract (Swedish)
This study investigates acoustic and articulatory correlates of South Swedish word accents (Accent 1 vs. 2) – a tonal distinction traditionally associated with F0 timing. The study is motivated by previous findings on (i) the acoustic complexity of tonal prosody and (ii) tonal-articulatory interplay in other languages. Acoustic and articulatory (EMA) data from two controlled experiments are reported (14 speakers in total; pilot EMA recordings with 2 speakers). Apart from the well-established F0 timing pattern, results of Experiment 1 reveal a longer duration of a post-stress consonant in Accent 2 than in Accent 1, a higher degree of creaky voice in Accent 1, as well as a
deviant (two-peak) pitch pattern in Accent 2 for one of eight... (More)
This study investigates acoustic and articulatory correlates of South Swedish word accents (Accent 1 vs. 2) – a tonal distinction traditionally associated with F0 timing. The study is motivated by previous findings on (i) the acoustic complexity of tonal prosody and (ii) tonal-articulatory interplay in other languages. Acoustic and articulatory (EMA) data from two controlled experiments are reported (14 speakers in total; pilot EMA recordings with 2 speakers). Apart from the well-established F0 timing pattern, results of Experiment 1 reveal a longer duration of a post-stress consonant in Accent 2 than in Accent 1, a higher degree of creaky voice in Accent 1, as well as a
deviant (two-peak) pitch pattern in Accent 2 for one of eight discourse conditions used in the experiment. Experiment 2 reveals an effect of word accent on vowel articulation, as the tongue body gesture target is reached earlier in Accent 2. It also suggests slight but (marginally) significant word-accent effects on word-initial gestural coordination, taking slightly different forms in the two speakers, as well as corresponding differences in word-initial formant patterns. Results are discussed concerning their potential perceptual relevance, as well as with reference to the c-center effect discussed within Articulatory Phonology. (Less)
Abstract
This study investigates acoustic and articulatory correlates of South Swedish word accents (Accent 1 vs. 2) — a tonal distinction traditionally associated with F0 timing. The study is motivated by previous findings on (i) the acoustic complexity of tonal prosody and (ii) tonal-articulatory interplay in other languages.

Acoustic and articulatory (EMA) data from two controlled experiments are reported (14 speakers in total; pilot EMA recordings with 2 speakers). Apart from the well-established F0 timing pattern, results of Experiment 1 reveal a longer duration of a post-stress consonant in Accent 2 than in Accent 1, a higher degree of creaky voice in Accent 1, as well as a deviant (two-peak) pitch pattern in Accent 2 for one of... (More)
This study investigates acoustic and articulatory correlates of South Swedish word accents (Accent 1 vs. 2) — a tonal distinction traditionally associated with F0 timing. The study is motivated by previous findings on (i) the acoustic complexity of tonal prosody and (ii) tonal-articulatory interplay in other languages.

Acoustic and articulatory (EMA) data from two controlled experiments are reported (14 speakers in total; pilot EMA recordings with 2 speakers). Apart from the well-established F0 timing pattern, results of Experiment 1 reveal a longer duration of a post-stress consonant in Accent 2 than in Accent 1, a higher degree of creaky voice in Accent 1, as well as a deviant (two-peak) pitch pattern in Accent 2 for one of eight discourse conditions used in the experiment. Experiment 2 reveals an effect of word accent on vowel articulation, as the tongue body gesture target is reached earlier in Accent 2. It also suggests slight but (marginally) significant word-accent effects on word-initial gestural coordination, taking slightly different forms in the two speakers, as well as corresponding differences in word-initial formant patterns. Results are discussed concerning their potential perceptual relevance, as well as with reference to the c-center effect discussed within Articulatory Phonology. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
speech production, pitch, lexical tone, voice quality, articulatory gestures, articulatory phonology, EMA, speech production, pitch, lexical tone, voice quality, articulatory gestures, articulatory phonology, EMA
in
Interspeech 2017
editor
Lacerda (chair), Francisco and
pages
3236 - 3240
conference name
Interspeech 2017
external identifiers
  • scopus:85039155349
ISSN
1990-9772
DOI
10.21437/Interspeech.2017-1502
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1ad3cccb-d24d-4073-9791-12d342575c8e
date added to LUP
2017-09-02 22:08:03
date last changed
2018-01-14 04:35:23
@inproceedings{1ad3cccb-d24d-4073-9791-12d342575c8e,
  abstract     = {This study investigates acoustic and articulatory correlates of South Swedish word accents (Accent 1 vs. 2) — a tonal distinction traditionally associated with F0 timing. The study is motivated by previous findings on (i) the acoustic complexity of tonal prosody and (ii) tonal-articulatory interplay in other languages.<br/><br/>Acoustic and articulatory (EMA) data from two controlled experiments are reported (14 speakers in total; pilot EMA recordings with 2 speakers). Apart from the well-established F0 timing pattern, results of Experiment 1 reveal a longer duration of a post-stress consonant in Accent 2 than in Accent 1, a higher degree of creaky voice in Accent 1, as well as a deviant (two-peak) pitch pattern in Accent 2 for one of eight discourse conditions used in the experiment. Experiment 2 reveals an effect of word accent on vowel articulation, as the tongue body gesture target is reached earlier in Accent 2. It also suggests slight but (marginally) significant word-accent effects on word-initial gestural coordination, taking slightly different forms in the two speakers, as well as corresponding differences in word-initial formant patterns. Results are discussed concerning their potential perceptual relevance, as well as with reference to the c-center effect discussed within Articulatory Phonology. },
  author       = {Svensson Lundmark, Malin and Ambrazaitis, Gilbert and Ewald, Otto},
  booktitle    = {Interspeech 2017},
  editor       = {Lacerda (chair), Francisco},
  issn         = {1990-9772},
  keyword      = {speech production, pitch, lexical tone, voice quality, articulatory gestures, articulatory phonology, EMA, speech production,pitch,lexical tone,voice quality,articulatory gestures, articulatory phonology,EMA},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3236--3240},
  title        = {Exploring multidimensionality : Acoustic and articulatory correlates of Swedish word accents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21437/Interspeech.2017-1502},
  year         = {2017},
}