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Utilizing the generic design analysis (GDA) process model within an extended set of design analysis contexts

Eriksson, Martin LU ; Petersson, Håkan LU ; Motte, Damien LU and Bjärnemo, Robert LU (2017) ASME 2017 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2017 11. p.011-028
Abstract

In most industrial product development projects, computer-based design analysis, or simply design analysis, is frequently utilized. Several design analysis process models exist in the literature for the planning, execution and follow-up of such design analysis tasks. Most of these process models deal explicitly with design analysis tasks within two specific contexts: the context of design evaluation, and the context of design optimization. There are, however, several more contexts within which design analysis tasks are executed. Originating from industrial practice, four contexts were found to represent a significant part of all design analysis tasks in industry. These are: 1. Explorative analysis, aiming at the determination of... (More)

In most industrial product development projects, computer-based design analysis, or simply design analysis, is frequently utilized. Several design analysis process models exist in the literature for the planning, execution and follow-up of such design analysis tasks. Most of these process models deal explicitly with design analysis tasks within two specific contexts: the context of design evaluation, and the context of design optimization. There are, however, several more contexts within which design analysis tasks are executed. Originating from industrial practice, four contexts were found to represent a significant part of all design analysis tasks in industry. These are: 1. Explorative analysis, aiming at the determination of important design parameters associated with an existing or predefined design solution (of which design optimization is a part). 2. Evaluation, aiming at giving quantitative information on specific design parameters in support of further design decisions. 3. Physical testing, aiming at validating design analysis models through physical testing, that is, determining the degree to which models are accurate representations of the real world from the perspective of the intended uses of the models. 4. Method development, that is the development, verification and validation of specific guidelines, procedures or templates for the design analyst and/or the engineering designer to follow when performing a design analysis task. A design analysis process model needs to be able to deal with at least these four. In this work, a process model named the generic design analysis (GDA) process model, is applied to these four contexts. The principles for the adaptation of the GDA process model to different contexts are described. The use of the GDA process model in these contexts is exemplified with industrial cases: explorative analysis of design parameters of a bumper beam system, the final physical acceptance tests of a device transportation system (collision test, drop test, vibration test), and the method development of a template for analyzing a valve in a combustion engine. The "Evaluation" context is not exemplified as it is the most common one in industry. The GDA process model has been successfully used for the four contexts. Using the adaptation principles and industrial cases, the adaptation of the GDA process model to additional contexts is also possible.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
design analysis process model, computer-based design analysis, engineering design process model, template, Machine Design, maskinkonstruktion, Product Development, produktutveckling
host publication
Proceedings of the International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition - IMECE'17
volume
11
pages
15 pages
publisher
American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
conference name
ASME 2017 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2017
conference location
Tampa, United States
conference dates
2017-11-03 - 2017-11-09
external identifiers
  • scopus:85040938287
ISBN
9780791858462
DOI
10.1115/IMECE2017-71205
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b7591e0-5f5b-404c-8720-1e312848b348
date added to LUP
2018-02-06 12:31:27
date last changed
2019-01-06 13:43:18
@inproceedings{1b7591e0-5f5b-404c-8720-1e312848b348,
  abstract     = {<p>In most industrial product development projects, computer-based design analysis, or simply design analysis, is frequently utilized. Several design analysis process models exist in the literature for the planning, execution and follow-up of such design analysis tasks. Most of these process models deal explicitly with design analysis tasks within two specific contexts: the context of design evaluation, and the context of design optimization. There are, however, several more contexts within which design analysis tasks are executed. Originating from industrial practice, four contexts were found to represent a significant part of all design analysis tasks in industry. These are: 1. Explorative analysis, aiming at the determination of important design parameters associated with an existing or predefined design solution (of which design optimization is a part). 2. Evaluation, aiming at giving quantitative information on specific design parameters in support of further design decisions. 3. Physical testing, aiming at validating design analysis models through physical testing, that is, determining the degree to which models are accurate representations of the real world from the perspective of the intended uses of the models. 4. Method development, that is the development, verification and validation of specific guidelines, procedures or templates for the design analyst and/or the engineering designer to follow when performing a design analysis task. A design analysis process model needs to be able to deal with at least these four. In this work, a process model named the generic design analysis (GDA) process model, is applied to these four contexts. The principles for the adaptation of the GDA process model to different contexts are described. The use of the GDA process model in these contexts is exemplified with industrial cases: explorative analysis of design parameters of a bumper beam system, the final physical acceptance tests of a device transportation system (collision test, drop test, vibration test), and the method development of a template for analyzing a valve in a combustion engine. The "Evaluation" context is not exemplified as it is the most common one in industry. The GDA process model has been successfully used for the four contexts. Using the adaptation principles and industrial cases, the adaptation of the GDA process model to additional contexts is also possible.</p>},
  author       = {Eriksson, Martin and Petersson, Håkan and Motte, Damien and Bjärnemo, Robert},
  isbn         = {9780791858462},
  keyword      = {design analysis process model,computer-based design analysis,engineering design process model,template,Machine Design,maskinkonstruktion,Product Development,produktutveckling},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Tampa, United States},
  pages        = {011--028},
  publisher    = {American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)},
  title        = {Utilizing the generic design analysis (GDA) process model within an extended set of design analysis contexts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2017-71205},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2017},
}