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A multi-level model correlation approach for low-frequency vibration transmission in wood structures

Flodén, O. LU ; Persson, K. LU and Sandberg, G. LU (2018) In Engineering Structures 157. p.27-41
Abstract

The main challenge in predicting structure-borne sound in wood buildings is to accurately model the vibration transmission between the source and the receiving room. Large variations in model parameters make it difficult to predict absolute vibration levels and to make conclusions regarding the relative effects of different designs. A step towards establishing reliable models is to investigate the possibilities and limitations of using deterministic methods, which requires correlations between simulations and measurements. In this paper, we present a multi-level model correlation approach for low-frequency vibration transmission in wood buildings. We apply the proposed approach to a scaled-size experimental structure representing a part... (More)

The main challenge in predicting structure-borne sound in wood buildings is to accurately model the vibration transmission between the source and the receiving room. Large variations in model parameters make it difficult to predict absolute vibration levels and to make conclusions regarding the relative effects of different designs. A step towards establishing reliable models is to investigate the possibilities and limitations of using deterministic methods, which requires correlations between simulations and measurements. In this paper, we present a multi-level model correlation approach for low-frequency vibration transmission in wood buildings. We apply the proposed approach to a scaled-size experimental structure representing a part of a two-storey wood building, and we evaluate the results for frequencies up to 100 Hz. We perform correlations between simulations and measurements four different levels: structural components (viz. beams and boards), planar structures (viz. floor, ceiling and walls), room structures and the complete structure. The results indicate that the dynamic behaviour of the experimental structure was to a great extent captured by the developed model. Based on the observations made in the multi-level correlations, we discuss important model parameters and propose modelling guidelines. We conclude that it is possible to employ deterministic methods in order to simulate the low-frequency vibration transmission in wood buildings provided that measurement data for calibration purposes are available. The developed numerical model can be used as a reference model for investigations on the effects of variations and uncertainties in the modelling.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Finite element method, Model correlation, Structure-borne sound, Vibration transmission, Wood buildings
in
Engineering Structures
volume
157
pages
15 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85040763484
ISSN
0141-0296
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b9f3f04-c837-40de-a89e-2abc7fb8fc0a
date added to LUP
2018-01-30 07:28:46
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:35:47
@article{1b9f3f04-c837-40de-a89e-2abc7fb8fc0a,
  abstract     = {<p>The main challenge in predicting structure-borne sound in wood buildings is to accurately model the vibration transmission between the source and the receiving room. Large variations in model parameters make it difficult to predict absolute vibration levels and to make conclusions regarding the relative effects of different designs. A step towards establishing reliable models is to investigate the possibilities and limitations of using deterministic methods, which requires correlations between simulations and measurements. In this paper, we present a multi-level model correlation approach for low-frequency vibration transmission in wood buildings. We apply the proposed approach to a scaled-size experimental structure representing a part of a two-storey wood building, and we evaluate the results for frequencies up to 100 Hz. We perform correlations between simulations and measurements four different levels: structural components (viz. beams and boards), planar structures (viz. floor, ceiling and walls), room structures and the complete structure. The results indicate that the dynamic behaviour of the experimental structure was to a great extent captured by the developed model. Based on the observations made in the multi-level correlations, we discuss important model parameters and propose modelling guidelines. We conclude that it is possible to employ deterministic methods in order to simulate the low-frequency vibration transmission in wood buildings provided that measurement data for calibration purposes are available. The developed numerical model can be used as a reference model for investigations on the effects of variations and uncertainties in the modelling.</p>},
  author       = {Flodén, O. and Persson, K. and Sandberg, G.},
  issn         = {0141-0296},
  keyword      = {Finite element method,Model correlation,Structure-borne sound,Vibration transmission,Wood buildings},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  pages        = {27--41},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Engineering Structures},
  title        = {A multi-level model correlation approach for low-frequency vibration transmission in wood structures},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {157},
  year         = {2018},
}