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Exploring Goal Conflicts and How They Are Managed in a Biomedical Laboratory Using Rasmussen’s Model of Boundaries

Vijayan, Viji and Smoker, Anthony John LU (2020) In Applied Biosafety
Abstract

Introduction: Occupational health and safety management systems are widely used as a systematic approach to managing occupational health and safety. However, sometimes they are restrictive and underspecified to deal with dynamic workplace demands. Rasmussen used a model of boundaries to conceptualize this dynamic model of safety, where the space of possibilities lay within 3 boundaries and workers used various means to stay within the boundaries to remain both productive and safe at work. Methods: This study applied the Rasmussen model of boundaries to understand the factors that formed the boundaries, the gradients, and countergradients in a biomedical laboratory. Results: The most central goal was to be the first to publish, and this... (More)

Introduction: Occupational health and safety management systems are widely used as a systematic approach to managing occupational health and safety. However, sometimes they are restrictive and underspecified to deal with dynamic workplace demands. Rasmussen used a model of boundaries to conceptualize this dynamic model of safety, where the space of possibilities lay within 3 boundaries and workers used various means to stay within the boundaries to remain both productive and safe at work. Methods: This study applied the Rasmussen model of boundaries to understand the factors that formed the boundaries, the gradients, and countergradients in a biomedical laboratory. Results: The most central goal was to be the first to publish, and this formed the boundary to scientific output failure; the boundary to unacceptable workload and boundary to functionally acceptable performance were the other 2 boundaries in line with the Rasmussen model. The workers had developed methods (mental risk assessment, teamwork, and experience and familiarity) of working, which ensured they remained productive and safe. This can be described as resilient performance, where resilience is not something that a system has but something it does to adjust their performance when faced with expected or unexpected changes. Discussion and Conclusion: A customized portfolio of rule-based non negotiable instructions and a risk assessment–based approach would be best suited for a biomedical laboratory. The workers have learned resilient performance on their own and unknowingly are already practicing this. It is now time to formally incorporate such practices into the safety systems of biomedical laboratories.

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publication status
epub
subject
keywords
biosafety, mental risk assessment, mentoring, Rasmussen model of boundaries, resilient performance
in
Applied Biosafety
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • scopus:85084485595
ISSN
1535-6760
DOI
10.1177/1535676020919624
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1d0e7d8c-9511-4e08-b0eb-0f6f2235a0d8
date added to LUP
2020-06-10 12:13:47
date last changed
2020-06-11 02:07:44
@article{1d0e7d8c-9511-4e08-b0eb-0f6f2235a0d8,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: Occupational health and safety management systems are widely used as a systematic approach to managing occupational health and safety. However, sometimes they are restrictive and underspecified to deal with dynamic workplace demands. Rasmussen used a model of boundaries to conceptualize this dynamic model of safety, where the space of possibilities lay within 3 boundaries and workers used various means to stay within the boundaries to remain both productive and safe at work. Methods: This study applied the Rasmussen model of boundaries to understand the factors that formed the boundaries, the gradients, and countergradients in a biomedical laboratory. Results: The most central goal was to be the first to publish, and this formed the boundary to scientific output failure; the boundary to unacceptable workload and boundary to functionally acceptable performance were the other 2 boundaries in line with the Rasmussen model. The workers had developed methods (mental risk assessment, teamwork, and experience and familiarity) of working, which ensured they remained productive and safe. This can be described as resilient performance, where resilience is not something that a system has but something it does to adjust their performance when faced with expected or unexpected changes. Discussion and Conclusion: A customized portfolio of rule-based non negotiable instructions and a risk assessment–based approach would be best suited for a biomedical laboratory. The workers have learned resilient performance on their own and unknowingly are already practicing this. It is now time to formally incorporate such practices into the safety systems of biomedical laboratories.</p>},
  author       = {Vijayan, Viji and Smoker, Anthony John},
  issn         = {1535-6760},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  series       = {Applied Biosafety},
  title        = {Exploring Goal Conflicts and How They Are Managed in a Biomedical Laboratory Using Rasmussen’s Model of Boundaries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1535676020919624},
  doi          = {10.1177/1535676020919624},
  year         = {2020},
}