Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Human Neural Stem Cells for Ischemic Stroke Treatment

Kokaia, Zaal LU orcid and Darsalia, Vladimer LU (2018) In Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation 66. p.249-263
Abstract

Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide and a major cause of disability. It takes place when the brain does not receive sufficient blood supply due to the blood clot in the vessels or narrowing of vessels’ inner space due to accumulation of fat products. Apart from thrombolysis (dissolving of blood clot) and thrombectomy (surgical removal of blood clot or widening of vessel inner area) during the first hours after an ischemic stroke, no effective treatment to improve functional recovery exists in the post-ischemic phase. Due to their narrow therapeutic time window, thrombolysis and thrombectomy are unavailable to more than 80% of stroke patients. Many experimental studies carried out in animal models of stroke... (More)

Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide and a major cause of disability. It takes place when the brain does not receive sufficient blood supply due to the blood clot in the vessels or narrowing of vessels’ inner space due to accumulation of fat products. Apart from thrombolysis (dissolving of blood clot) and thrombectomy (surgical removal of blood clot or widening of vessel inner area) during the first hours after an ischemic stroke, no effective treatment to improve functional recovery exists in the post-ischemic phase. Due to their narrow therapeutic time window, thrombolysis and thrombectomy are unavailable to more than 80% of stroke patients. Many experimental studies carried out in animal models of stroke have demonstrated that stem cell transplantation may become a new therapeutic strategy in stroke. Transplantation of stem cells of different origin and stage of development has been shown to lead to improvement in experimental models of stroke through several mechanisms including neuronal replacement, modulation of cellular and synaptic plasticity and inflammation, neuroprotection and stimulation of angiogenesis. Several clinical studies and trials based on stem cell delivery in stroke patients are in progress with goal of improvements of functional recovery through mechanisms other than neuronal replacement. These approaches may provide therapeutic benefit, but generation of specific neurons for reconstruction of stroke-injured neural circuitry remains ultimate challenge. For this purpose, neural stem cells could be developed from multiple sources and fated to adopt required neuronal phenotype.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation
series title
Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation
volume
66
pages
15 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:30209663
  • scopus:85053994850
ISSN
1861-0412
0080-1844
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-93485-3_11
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1ee5ed20-9c86-4248-84d9-fc60c4e62d46
date added to LUP
2018-10-24 08:14:54
date last changed
2021-10-06 04:18:42
@inbook{1ee5ed20-9c86-4248-84d9-fc60c4e62d46,
  abstract     = {<p>Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide and a major cause of disability. It takes place when the brain does not receive sufficient blood supply due to the blood clot in the vessels or narrowing of vessels’ inner space due to accumulation of fat products. Apart from thrombolysis (dissolving of blood clot) and thrombectomy (surgical removal of blood clot or widening of vessel inner area) during the first hours after an ischemic stroke, no effective treatment to improve functional recovery exists in the post-ischemic phase. Due to their narrow therapeutic time window, thrombolysis and thrombectomy are unavailable to more than 80% of stroke patients. Many experimental studies carried out in animal models of stroke have demonstrated that stem cell transplantation may become a new therapeutic strategy in stroke. Transplantation of stem cells of different origin and stage of development has been shown to lead to improvement in experimental models of stroke through several mechanisms including neuronal replacement, modulation of cellular and synaptic plasticity and inflammation, neuroprotection and stimulation of angiogenesis. Several clinical studies and trials based on stem cell delivery in stroke patients are in progress with goal of improvements of functional recovery through mechanisms other than neuronal replacement. These approaches may provide therapeutic benefit, but generation of specific neurons for reconstruction of stroke-injured neural circuitry remains ultimate challenge. For this purpose, neural stem cells could be developed from multiple sources and fated to adopt required neuronal phenotype.</p>},
  author       = {Kokaia, Zaal and Darsalia, Vladimer},
  booktitle    = {Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation},
  issn         = {1861-0412},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {249--263},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation},
  title        = {Human Neural Stem Cells for Ischemic Stroke Treatment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93485-3_11},
  doi          = {10.1007/978-3-319-93485-3_11},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2018},
}