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Outdoor thermal comfort in public space in warm-humid Guayaquil, Ecuador

Johansson, Erik LU ; Yahia, Moohammed Wasim LU ; Arroyo, Ivette LU and Bengs, Christer (2018) In International Journal of Biometeorology 62(3). p.387-399
Abstract

The thermal environment outdoors affects human comfort and health. Mental and physical performance is reduced at high levels of air temperature being a problem especially in tropical climates. This paper deals with human comfort in the warm-humid city of Guayaquil, Ecuador. The main aim was to examine the influence of urban micrometeorological conditions on people’s subjective thermal perception and to compare it with two thermal comfort indices: the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and the standard effective temperature (SET*). The outdoor thermal comfort was assessed through micrometeorological measurements of air temperature, humidity, mean radiant temperature and wind speed together with a questionnaire survey consisting... (More)

The thermal environment outdoors affects human comfort and health. Mental and physical performance is reduced at high levels of air temperature being a problem especially in tropical climates. This paper deals with human comfort in the warm-humid city of Guayaquil, Ecuador. The main aim was to examine the influence of urban micrometeorological conditions on people’s subjective thermal perception and to compare it with two thermal comfort indices: the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and the standard effective temperature (SET*). The outdoor thermal comfort was assessed through micrometeorological measurements of air temperature, humidity, mean radiant temperature and wind speed together with a questionnaire survey consisting of 544 interviews conducted in five public places of the city during both the dry and rainy seasons. The neutral and preferred values as well as the upper comfort limits of PET and SET* were determined. For both indices, the neutral values and upper thermal comfort limits were lower during the rainy season, whereas the preferred values were higher during the rainy season. Regardless of season, the neutral values of PET and SET* are above the theoretical neutral value of each index. The results show that local people accept thermal conditions which are above acceptable comfort limits in temperate climates and that the subjective thermal perception varies within a wide range. It is clear, however, that the majority of the people in Guayaquil experience the outdoor thermal environment during daytime as too warm, and therefore, it is important to promote an urban design which creates shade and ventilation.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Ecuador, Microclimate, Outdoor thermal comfort, Subjective thermal comfort assessment, Warm-humid climate
in
International Journal of Biometeorology
volume
62
issue
3
pages
13 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85014759896
ISSN
0020-7128
DOI
10.1007/s00484-017-1329-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f018e0d-35c1-40e4-836f-6e747ed0d783
date added to LUP
2018-05-07 14:29:30
date last changed
2019-08-14 04:16:04
@article{1f018e0d-35c1-40e4-836f-6e747ed0d783,
  abstract     = {<p>The thermal environment outdoors affects human comfort and health. Mental and physical performance is reduced at high levels of air temperature being a problem especially in tropical climates. This paper deals with human comfort in the warm-humid city of Guayaquil, Ecuador. The main aim was to examine the influence of urban micrometeorological conditions on people’s subjective thermal perception and to compare it with two thermal comfort indices: the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and the standard effective temperature (SET*). The outdoor thermal comfort was assessed through micrometeorological measurements of air temperature, humidity, mean radiant temperature and wind speed together with a questionnaire survey consisting of 544 interviews conducted in five public places of the city during both the dry and rainy seasons. The neutral and preferred values as well as the upper comfort limits of PET and SET* were determined. For both indices, the neutral values and upper thermal comfort limits were lower during the rainy season, whereas the preferred values were higher during the rainy season. Regardless of season, the neutral values of PET and SET* are above the theoretical neutral value of each index. The results show that local people accept thermal conditions which are above acceptable comfort limits in temperate climates and that the subjective thermal perception varies within a wide range. It is clear, however, that the majority of the people in Guayaquil experience the outdoor thermal environment during daytime as too warm, and therefore, it is important to promote an urban design which creates shade and ventilation.</p>},
  author       = {Johansson, Erik and Yahia, Moohammed Wasim and Arroyo, Ivette and Bengs, Christer},
  issn         = {0020-7128},
  keyword      = {Ecuador,Microclimate,Outdoor thermal comfort,Subjective thermal comfort assessment,Warm-humid climate},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {387--399},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Journal of Biometeorology},
  title        = {Outdoor thermal comfort in public space in warm-humid Guayaquil, Ecuador},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00484-017-1329-x},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2018},
}