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Current global warming appears anomalous in relation to the climate of the last 20 000 years

Björck, Svante LU (2011) Environmental change and socio-economic response in the Baltic region In Climate Research 48(Climate Research 1). p.5-11
Abstract
To distinguish between natural and anthropogenic forcing, the supposedly ongoing global warming needs to be put in a longer, geological perspective. When the last ca. 20 000 yr of climate development is reviewed, including the climatically dramatic period when the Last Ice Age ended, the Last Termination, it appears that the last centuries of globally rising temperatures should be regarded as an anomaly. Other, often synchronous climate events are not expressed in a globally consistent way, but rather are the expression of the complexities of the climate system. Due to the

often poor precision in the dating of older proxy records, such a statement will obviously be met with some opposition. However, as long as no globally... (More)
To distinguish between natural and anthropogenic forcing, the supposedly ongoing global warming needs to be put in a longer, geological perspective. When the last ca. 20 000 yr of climate development is reviewed, including the climatically dramatic period when the Last Ice Age ended, the Last Termination, it appears that the last centuries of globally rising temperatures should be regarded as an anomaly. Other, often synchronous climate events are not expressed in a globally consistent way, but rather are the expression of the complexities of the climate system. Due to the

often poor precision in the dating of older proxy records, such a statement will obviously be met with some opposition. However, as long as no globally consistent climate event prior to today’s global warming has been clearly documented, and considering that climate trends during the last millennia

in different parts of the world have, in the last century or so, changed direction into a globally warming trend, we ought to regard the ongoing changes as anomalies, triggered by anthropogenically forced alterations of the carbon cycle in the general global environment. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Global warming, Long-term perspective, Climate anomaly
in
Climate Research
editor
Wittkowski, Andrzej; Harff, Jan; Zorita, Eduardo; ; and
volume
48
issue
Climate Research 1
pages
6 pages
publisher
Inter-Research
conference name
Environmental change and socio-economic response in the Baltic region
external identifiers
  • wos:000292889700002
  • scopus:79960667347
ISSN
1616-1572
0936-577X
DOI
10.3354/cr00873
project
MERGE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
be77b722-b826-4a3c-a549-8c43b0322b8e (old id 2062988)
date added to LUP
2011-10-31 16:24:45
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:31:08
@inproceedings{be77b722-b826-4a3c-a549-8c43b0322b8e,
  abstract     = {To distinguish between natural and anthropogenic forcing, the supposedly ongoing global warming needs to be put in a longer, geological perspective. When the last ca. 20 000 yr of climate development is reviewed, including the climatically dramatic period when the Last Ice Age ended, the Last Termination, it appears that the last centuries of globally rising temperatures should be regarded as an anomaly. Other, often synchronous climate events are not expressed in a globally consistent way, but rather are the expression of the complexities of the climate system. Due to the<br/><br>
often poor precision in the dating of older proxy records, such a statement will obviously be met with some opposition. However, as long as no globally consistent climate event prior to today’s global warming has been clearly documented, and considering that climate trends during the last millennia<br/><br>
in different parts of the world have, in the last century or so, changed direction into a globally warming trend, we ought to regard the ongoing changes as anomalies, triggered by anthropogenically forced alterations of the carbon cycle in the general global environment.},
  author       = {Björck, Svante},
  booktitle    = {Climate Research},
  editor       = {Wittkowski, Andrzej and Harff, Jan and Zorita, Eduardo},
  issn         = {1616-1572},
  keyword      = {Global warming,Long-term perspective,Climate anomaly},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Climate Research 1},
  pages        = {5--11},
  publisher    = {Inter-Research},
  title        = {Current global warming appears anomalous in relation to the climate of the last 20 000 years},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/cr00873},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2011},
}