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3D domain-swapped human cystatin c with amyloidlike intermolecular beta-sheets

Janowski, R; Kozak, M; Abrahamson, Magnus LU ; Grubb, Anders LU and Jaskolski, M (2005) In Proteins 61(3). p.570-578
Abstract
Oligomerization of human cystatin C (HCC) leads to amyloid deposits in brain arteries, and this process is greatly accelerated with a naturally occurring L68Q variant. The crystal structures of N-truncated and full-length HCC (cubic form) showed dimer formation via three-dimensional (3D) domain swapping, and this observation has led to the suggestion that an analogous domain-swapping mechanism, but propagated in an open-ended fashion, could be the basis of HCC fibril formation. Here we report that full-length HCC, when crystallized in a new, tetragonal form, dimerizes by swapping the same secondary structure elements but with a very different overall structure generated by the flexibility of the hinge linking the moveable elements. The... (More)
Oligomerization of human cystatin C (HCC) leads to amyloid deposits in brain arteries, and this process is greatly accelerated with a naturally occurring L68Q variant. The crystal structures of N-truncated and full-length HCC (cubic form) showed dimer formation via three-dimensional (3D) domain swapping, and this observation has led to the suggestion that an analogous domain-swapping mechanism, but propagated in an open-ended fashion, could be the basis of HCC fibril formation. Here we report that full-length HCC, when crystallized in a new, tetragonal form, dimerizes by swapping the same secondary structure elements but with a very different overall structure generated by the flexibility of the hinge linking the moveable elements. The beta-strands of the beta-cores of the two folding units of the present dimer are roughly parallel, while they formed an angle of about 100 degrees in the previous two structures. The dimers pack around a crystallographic dyad by extending their molecular beta-sheets in an intermolecular context. At the other edge of the molecular beta-sheet, side-chain-side-chain hydrogen bonds propagate the beta-structure in the same direction. In consequence, a supramolecular crystal structure is generated, with all the P-strands of the domain-swapped dimers being perpendicular to one crystallographic direction. This observation is relevant to amyloid aggregation of HCC, as X-ray diffraction studies of amyloid fibrils show them to have ordered, repeating structure, consistent with the so-called cross-beta structure, in which extended polypeptide chains are perpendicular to the fiber axis and form infinite beta-sheets that are parallel to this axis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fibril, amyloid, cross-beta structure, human cystatin C, 3D domain swapping, cysteine protease inhibitor
in
Proteins
volume
61
issue
3
pages
570 - 578
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:16170782
  • wos:000233029800013
  • scopus:27544500011
ISSN
0887-3585
DOI
10.1002/prot.20633
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3c1ba1b0-24c9-4371-8f3f-6b1edab0a550 (old id 214144)
date added to LUP
2007-09-28 09:56:51
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:10:47
@article{3c1ba1b0-24c9-4371-8f3f-6b1edab0a550,
  abstract     = {Oligomerization of human cystatin C (HCC) leads to amyloid deposits in brain arteries, and this process is greatly accelerated with a naturally occurring L68Q variant. The crystal structures of N-truncated and full-length HCC (cubic form) showed dimer formation via three-dimensional (3D) domain swapping, and this observation has led to the suggestion that an analogous domain-swapping mechanism, but propagated in an open-ended fashion, could be the basis of HCC fibril formation. Here we report that full-length HCC, when crystallized in a new, tetragonal form, dimerizes by swapping the same secondary structure elements but with a very different overall structure generated by the flexibility of the hinge linking the moveable elements. The beta-strands of the beta-cores of the two folding units of the present dimer are roughly parallel, while they formed an angle of about 100 degrees in the previous two structures. The dimers pack around a crystallographic dyad by extending their molecular beta-sheets in an intermolecular context. At the other edge of the molecular beta-sheet, side-chain-side-chain hydrogen bonds propagate the beta-structure in the same direction. In consequence, a supramolecular crystal structure is generated, with all the P-strands of the domain-swapped dimers being perpendicular to one crystallographic direction. This observation is relevant to amyloid aggregation of HCC, as X-ray diffraction studies of amyloid fibrils show them to have ordered, repeating structure, consistent with the so-called cross-beta structure, in which extended polypeptide chains are perpendicular to the fiber axis and form infinite beta-sheets that are parallel to this axis.},
  author       = {Janowski, R and Kozak, M and Abrahamson, Magnus and Grubb, Anders and Jaskolski, M},
  issn         = {0887-3585},
  keyword      = {fibril,amyloid,cross-beta structure,human cystatin C,3D domain swapping,cysteine protease inhibitor},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {570--578},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Proteins},
  title        = {3D domain-swapped human cystatin c with amyloidlike intermolecular beta-sheets},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/prot.20633},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2005},
}