Advanced

Socioeconomic and occupational risk factors for venous thromboembolism in Sweden: A nationwide epidemiological study.

Zöller, Bengt LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2012) In Thrombosis Research 129. p.577-582
Abstract
Our aims were to investigate possible associations between hospitalisation for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and socioeconomic and occupational factors. A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register (1990-2007). Hospital diagnoses of VTE were based on the International Classification of Diseases. Standardised incidence ratios were calculated for different socioeconomic and occupational groups. A total of 43063 individuals aged >20years were hospitalised for VTE. Individuals with >12years of education were at lower risk for VTE. Blue-collar workers, farmers, and non-employed individuals had higher risks for VTE, and white collar workers and professionals lower risks. In males... (More)
Our aims were to investigate possible associations between hospitalisation for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and socioeconomic and occupational factors. A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register (1990-2007). Hospital diagnoses of VTE were based on the International Classification of Diseases. Standardised incidence ratios were calculated for different socioeconomic and occupational groups. A total of 43063 individuals aged >20years were hospitalised for VTE. Individuals with >12years of education were at lower risk for VTE. Blue-collar workers, farmers, and non-employed individuals had higher risks for VTE, and white collar workers and professionals lower risks. In males and/or females, risks for VTE were increased for assistant nurses; farmers; miners and quarry workers; mechanics, iron and metalware workers; wood workers; food manufacture workers; packers; loaders and warehouse workers; public safety and protection workers; cooks and stewards; home helpers; building caretakers; and cleaners. Decreased risks were observed for technical, chemical, physical, and biological workers; physicians; dentists; nurses; other health and medical workers; teachers, religious, juridical, and other social science-related workers; artistic workers; clerical workers; sale agents; and fishermen, whalers and sealers. High educational level and several occupations requiring high levels of education were protective against VTE, while the risks for VTE were increased for farmers, blue-collar workers and non-employed individuals. The mechanisms are unknown but it might involve persistent psychosocial stress related to low socioeconomic and occupational status. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Thrombosis Research
volume
129
pages
577 - 582
external identifiers
  • wos:000303433500026
  • pmid:21868069
  • scopus:84860407599
ISSN
1879-2472
DOI
10.1016/j.thromres.2011.07.050
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ee01ec0f-e3f1-43e6-a85d-40e7485b1fa9 (old id 2150702)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21868069?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-09-04 13:17:48
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:55:26
@article{ee01ec0f-e3f1-43e6-a85d-40e7485b1fa9,
  abstract     = {Our aims were to investigate possible associations between hospitalisation for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and socioeconomic and occupational factors. A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register (1990-2007). Hospital diagnoses of VTE were based on the International Classification of Diseases. Standardised incidence ratios were calculated for different socioeconomic and occupational groups. A total of 43063 individuals aged >20years were hospitalised for VTE. Individuals with >12years of education were at lower risk for VTE. Blue-collar workers, farmers, and non-employed individuals had higher risks for VTE, and white collar workers and professionals lower risks. In males and/or females, risks for VTE were increased for assistant nurses; farmers; miners and quarry workers; mechanics, iron and metalware workers; wood workers; food manufacture workers; packers; loaders and warehouse workers; public safety and protection workers; cooks and stewards; home helpers; building caretakers; and cleaners. Decreased risks were observed for technical, chemical, physical, and biological workers; physicians; dentists; nurses; other health and medical workers; teachers, religious, juridical, and other social science-related workers; artistic workers; clerical workers; sale agents; and fishermen, whalers and sealers. High educational level and several occupations requiring high levels of education were protective against VTE, while the risks for VTE were increased for farmers, blue-collar workers and non-employed individuals. The mechanisms are unknown but it might involve persistent psychosocial stress related to low socioeconomic and occupational status.},
  author       = {Zöller, Bengt and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1879-2472},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {577--582},
  series       = {Thrombosis Research},
  title        = {Socioeconomic and occupational risk factors for venous thromboembolism in Sweden: A nationwide epidemiological study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2011.07.050},
  volume       = {129},
  year         = {2012},
}