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Immunobiology of Intestinal Eosinophils - A Dogma in the Changing?

Svensson Frej, Marcus LU (2011) In Journal of Innate Immunity 3. p.565-576
Abstract
Infiltration of eosinophils into the intestinal mucosa is a typical hallmark of antiparasite immune responses and inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract, and eosinophils are thought to contribute to these processes by release of their cytotoxic granule content. However, utilizing novel tools to study eosinophils, it has been recognized that eosinophils are constitutively present in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, as the dogmatic antiparasite function of eosinophils has proven difficult to document experimentally, it has become increasingly clear that eosinophils are likely to have a more complex role than previously appreciated. Thus, the prevailing dogma of eosinophils merely as antiparasitic effector cells is changing.... (More)
Infiltration of eosinophils into the intestinal mucosa is a typical hallmark of antiparasite immune responses and inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract, and eosinophils are thought to contribute to these processes by release of their cytotoxic granule content. However, utilizing novel tools to study eosinophils, it has been recognized that eosinophils are constitutively present in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, as the dogmatic antiparasite function of eosinophils has proven difficult to document experimentally, it has become increasingly clear that eosinophils are likely to have a more complex role than previously appreciated. Thus, the prevailing dogma of eosinophils merely as antiparasitic effector cells is changing. Instead, it has been suggested that eosinophils can contribute also to several other processes in the intestinal mucosa, e.g. local tissue homeostasis and adaptive immune responses. This review describes the current knowledge regarding the characteristics and functions of intestinal eosinophils, and the regulation of eosinophil trafficking to the intestinal mucosa during the steady state and inflammation. Finally, potential additional and new roles of intestinal eosinophils in the intestinal mucosal immune system are discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Innate Immunity
volume
3
pages
565 - 576
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000296368900004
  • pmid:21860213
  • scopus:80054961279
ISSN
1662-811X
DOI
10.1159/000328799
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d1175cfc-2bc7-4ffb-ab3a-8592656a45eb (old id 2150767)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21860213?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-09-04 22:29:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:34:24
@article{d1175cfc-2bc7-4ffb-ab3a-8592656a45eb,
  abstract     = {Infiltration of eosinophils into the intestinal mucosa is a typical hallmark of antiparasite immune responses and inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract, and eosinophils are thought to contribute to these processes by release of their cytotoxic granule content. However, utilizing novel tools to study eosinophils, it has been recognized that eosinophils are constitutively present in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, as the dogmatic antiparasite function of eosinophils has proven difficult to document experimentally, it has become increasingly clear that eosinophils are likely to have a more complex role than previously appreciated. Thus, the prevailing dogma of eosinophils merely as antiparasitic effector cells is changing. Instead, it has been suggested that eosinophils can contribute also to several other processes in the intestinal mucosa, e.g. local tissue homeostasis and adaptive immune responses. This review describes the current knowledge regarding the characteristics and functions of intestinal eosinophils, and the regulation of eosinophil trafficking to the intestinal mucosa during the steady state and inflammation. Finally, potential additional and new roles of intestinal eosinophils in the intestinal mucosal immune system are discussed.},
  author       = {Svensson Frej, Marcus},
  issn         = {1662-811X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {565--576},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Journal of Innate Immunity},
  title        = {Immunobiology of Intestinal Eosinophils - A Dogma in the Changing?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328799},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2011},
}