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Biogrid-a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.

Wallman, Lars LU ; Akesson, Elisabet; Ceric, Dario; Andersson, Per Henrik; Day, Kelly; Hovatta, Outi; Falci, Scott; Laurell, Thomas LU and Sundström, Erik (2011) In Lab on A Chip 11. p.3241-3248
Abstract
Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a... (More)
Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Lab on A Chip
volume
11
pages
3241 - 3248
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • wos:000294503200005
  • pmid:21850297
  • scopus:80052552662
ISSN
1473-0189
DOI
10.1039/c1lc20316a
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
25947074-8364-4a2a-95c5-79ba9e3ba790 (old id 2150889)
date added to LUP
2011-08-31 10:57:56
date last changed
2017-10-08 03:05:40
@article{25947074-8364-4a2a-95c5-79ba9e3ba790,
  abstract     = {Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes.},
  author       = {Wallman, Lars and Akesson, Elisabet and Ceric, Dario and Andersson, Per Henrik and Day, Kelly and Hovatta, Outi and Falci, Scott and Laurell, Thomas and Sundström, Erik},
  issn         = {1473-0189},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3241--3248},
  publisher    = {Royal Society of Chemistry},
  series       = {Lab on A Chip},
  title        = {Biogrid-a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1lc20316a},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2011},
}