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Preterm infants' early developmental status is associated with later developmental outcome

Lundqvist, Cristina LU ; Lau, Gerd; Nordin, Per; Bona, Elsa and Sabel, Karl-Göran (2012) In Acta paediatrica 101. p.172-178
Abstract
Aim: To assess the development of preterm infants from 40 weeks gestational age to 18 months corrected age in order to identify early predictors of later development. Methods: Fifty-one infants were involved. Infant development was assessed at 40 and 44 weeks gestational age with the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale and a Self-Regulation Scale and at 3, 6, 10, 18 months corrected age with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. The quality of general movements was assessed at 1 and 3 months corrected age and maternal attachment style at infant's age of 6 months corrected age with the Relation Scale Questionnaire. Results: At term age and 1 month corrected age, preterm infants were less mature and had lower levels of... (More)
Aim: To assess the development of preterm infants from 40 weeks gestational age to 18 months corrected age in order to identify early predictors of later development. Methods: Fifty-one infants were involved. Infant development was assessed at 40 and 44 weeks gestational age with the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale and a Self-Regulation Scale and at 3, 6, 10, 18 months corrected age with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. The quality of general movements was assessed at 1 and 3 months corrected age and maternal attachment style at infant's age of 6 months corrected age with the Relation Scale Questionnaire. Results: At term age and 1 month corrected age, preterm infants were less mature and had lower levels of self-regulation than full-term infants. At 3 months corrected age, a higher proportion of preterm infants (43%) had mildly abnormal motor quality compared to the general population (25%). At all follow-ups, preterm infants had delayed mental, motor, and behavioral development, which was associated with the level of self-regulation, motor quality, and maternal attachment style. Maternal education level was the most predominant background factor related to infant development. Conclusion: Preterm infants show early-in-life deviations in self-regulation, motor quality, and development. These deviations are risk factors for later optimal functioning. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta paediatrica
volume
101
pages
172 - 178
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000298914000022
  • scopus:84855719952
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02442.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cb0bcf2a-44d9-430b-b4ed-d63875dd84be (old id 2150964)
date added to LUP
2011-10-07 15:53:21
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:00:09
@article{cb0bcf2a-44d9-430b-b4ed-d63875dd84be,
  abstract     = {Aim: To assess the development of preterm infants from 40 weeks gestational age to 18 months corrected age in order to identify early predictors of later development. Methods: Fifty-one infants were involved. Infant development was assessed at 40 and 44 weeks gestational age with the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale and a Self-Regulation Scale and at 3, 6, 10, 18 months corrected age with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. The quality of general movements was assessed at 1 and 3 months corrected age and maternal attachment style at infant's age of 6 months corrected age with the Relation Scale Questionnaire. Results: At term age and 1 month corrected age, preterm infants were less mature and had lower levels of self-regulation than full-term infants. At 3 months corrected age, a higher proportion of preterm infants (43%) had mildly abnormal motor quality compared to the general population (25%). At all follow-ups, preterm infants had delayed mental, motor, and behavioral development, which was associated with the level of self-regulation, motor quality, and maternal attachment style. Maternal education level was the most predominant background factor related to infant development. Conclusion: Preterm infants show early-in-life deviations in self-regulation, motor quality, and development. These deviations are risk factors for later optimal functioning.},
  author       = {Lundqvist, Cristina and Lau, Gerd and Nordin, Per and Bona, Elsa and Sabel, Karl-Göran},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {172--178},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta paediatrica},
  title        = {Preterm infants' early developmental status is associated with later developmental outcome},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02442.x},
  volume       = {101},
  year         = {2012},
}