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Effect of Food Intake on Commonly Used Pulsed Doppler and Tissue Doppler Measurements.

Dencker, Magnus LU ; Björgell, Ola LU and Hlebowicz, Joanna LU (2011) In Echocardiography (Mount Kisco, N.Y.) 28. p.843-847
Abstract
Objective: This study evaluates the effect of food intake on commonly used pulsed Doppler and tissue Doppler measurements. Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects aged 25.6 ± 4.5 years were investigated. A wide selection of pulsed Doppler and tissue Doppler variables were measured before a standardized meal as well as and 30 and 110 minutes afterwards. Results: The following variables increased significantly (P < 0.05) 30 minutes after food intake: left ventricular stroke volume, left ventricular cardiac output, left ventricular outflow velocity-time integral, peak of early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) mitral flow velocities, pulmonary vein peak velocities in systole (S) and in diastole (D), S/D, pulsed tissue Doppler peak... (More)
Objective: This study evaluates the effect of food intake on commonly used pulsed Doppler and tissue Doppler measurements. Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects aged 25.6 ± 4.5 years were investigated. A wide selection of pulsed Doppler and tissue Doppler variables were measured before a standardized meal as well as and 30 and 110 minutes afterwards. Results: The following variables increased significantly (P < 0.05) 30 minutes after food intake: left ventricular stroke volume, left ventricular cardiac output, left ventricular outflow velocity-time integral, peak of early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) mitral flow velocities, pulmonary vein peak velocities in systole (S) and in diastole (D), S/D, pulsed tissue Doppler peak systolic velocities, and late diastolic velocities. Deceleration time of E-wave decreased significantly (P < 0.05). The change in measured variables between fasting and 30 minutes after the food intake ranged from 7% to 28%. There were no significant (P > 0.05) changes in E/A, early diastolic tissue Doppler velocities (e'), and E/e'. Most, but not all variables returned to baseline values 110 minutes after food intake. Conclusions: This study shows that food intake affects several echocardiographic variables used to routinely assess diastolic function and hemodynamics. Further studies are warranted in older healthy subjects and in patients with various cardiac diseases to determine whether the findings are reproducible in such populations. (Echocardiography, 2011;**:1-5). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Echocardiography (Mount Kisco, N.Y.)
volume
28
pages
843 - 847
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000294911700010
  • pmid:21827540
  • scopus:81155162431
ISSN
1540-8175
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-8175.2011.01451.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8abb1110-c466-4f63-9046-b5ac50e67438 (old id 2151255)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21827540?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-09-04 15:37:05
date last changed
2017-10-01 05:04:26
@article{8abb1110-c466-4f63-9046-b5ac50e67438,
  abstract     = {Objective: This study evaluates the effect of food intake on commonly used pulsed Doppler and tissue Doppler measurements. Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects aged 25.6 ± 4.5 years were investigated. A wide selection of pulsed Doppler and tissue Doppler variables were measured before a standardized meal as well as and 30 and 110 minutes afterwards. Results: The following variables increased significantly (P &lt; 0.05) 30 minutes after food intake: left ventricular stroke volume, left ventricular cardiac output, left ventricular outflow velocity-time integral, peak of early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) mitral flow velocities, pulmonary vein peak velocities in systole (S) and in diastole (D), S/D, pulsed tissue Doppler peak systolic velocities, and late diastolic velocities. Deceleration time of E-wave decreased significantly (P &lt; 0.05). The change in measured variables between fasting and 30 minutes after the food intake ranged from 7% to 28%. There were no significant (P &gt; 0.05) changes in E/A, early diastolic tissue Doppler velocities (e'), and E/e'. Most, but not all variables returned to baseline values 110 minutes after food intake. Conclusions: This study shows that food intake affects several echocardiographic variables used to routinely assess diastolic function and hemodynamics. Further studies are warranted in older healthy subjects and in patients with various cardiac diseases to determine whether the findings are reproducible in such populations. (Echocardiography, 2011;**:1-5).},
  author       = {Dencker, Magnus and Björgell, Ola and Hlebowicz, Joanna},
  issn         = {1540-8175},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {843--847},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Echocardiography (Mount Kisco, N.Y.)},
  title        = {Effect of Food Intake on Commonly Used Pulsed Doppler and Tissue Doppler Measurements.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8175.2011.01451.x},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2011},
}